jet-14 one design restore project

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Barbarosa, Jun 16, 2014.

  1. Barbarosa
    Joined: Jun 2014
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Colorado

    Barbarosa New Member

    [​IMG]

    it was born in 1961
    it is a plywood dingy at heart

    top deck is ply with a canvas cloth like wall board patch tape, that has a rubberized paint that has cracked badly and a glue under it all... peeling this stuff off is a bear.

    besides heat gun and patience, any ideas?
     

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  2. Barbarosa
    Joined: Jun 2014
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Colorado

    Barbarosa New Member

    it was not stored well, so now as i look from stern the symmetry is off with a slight twist so i will not restore back to jet-14 race specifications or class exactness. even though it is cool that this hull, #600, has a history.

    not sure if i can re-bend it to have hull shape correctness and or if that effort would be worth it.

    appears the bottom is glass, and top is the rubberized paint over a cloth tape on top of ply

    will post pictures of mast. it has very dry areas and will see if usable in light winds on these small colorado lakes
     
  3. Barbarosa
    Joined: Jun 2014
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Colorado

    Barbarosa New Member

    [​IMG]

    note the cloth pulled back after some hot colorado sun...
     
  4. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    If, as you say, the goop that is in, or under, the cloth is rubbery, then it is not just a bear getting the fabric off. It will be another bear, possibly an angry grizzly, to get the rubbery stuff off the decks. Heat guns, solvents, (not at the same time) and a lot of determination might get you down to clean wood. After that.....glass/epoxy with some good paint to protect the epoxy from UV degradation.

    That is a pretty little boat that may be worth all the exertion that it will take to make it good again. That is, of course, if the rig, board, rudder and all, are in useable condition.

    Good luck and keep on keeping on.
     
  5. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Given the challenge of stripping the goop off the deck and the twist in the hull, I'm wondering if a better approach would be to replace the entire deck. That would provide an opportunity to straighten the hull as the deck provides most of the stiffness. Just a thought . . .
     

  6. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 3,032
    Likes: 226, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1279
    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Good thought AK. I would do it that way if I had a project of that kind. It has the advantage of discovering/replacing any sick wood that might be hiding under the decks.
     
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