Isuzu Diesel Engines

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by brian eiland, Dec 1, 2004.

  1. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    [Quote:= Originally Posted by D'ARTOIS] Look, I get the feeling that on the other side of the swimming pool there is little sympathy for Volvo engines, and to be strictly frank, my experiences with Volvo and their services aren't that great either.... [/QUOTE]





    Speaking of engines, I would ask if their are many persons having experience with Isuzu diesel engines in marine service. I just had occassion to purchase a used Isuzu diesel engined box van. The engine runs like a top. And everyone I talk to praises the durability of these units. And now that I'm aware of these vehicles I see them EVERYwhere. And none of them seems to be running poorly or spuing nasty exhaust.
     
  2. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    We have used Isuzu and LOVE them.
    The only hassle is almost anyone can purchase and "marinize" them..
    The level of equippment varies greatly , you only get what you pay for.

    The cheapos will have cheap exhaust manifolds and Hurth trannys.

    The better conversions will use better (Twin Disc) or other non pleasure boat trannys , and higher quality flex plates and exhaust systems.

    A good well built engine that will stand up , IF you use the workboat 24/7 cont ratings when specing the boat/tranny and propeller.

    FAST FRED
     
  3. Ilan Voyager
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Cancun Mexico

    Ilan Voyager Senior Member

    Nanni Diesel marinises Isuzu engines with good results but it's pretty expensive and with the change Euro-US dollar it becomes prohibitive.

    As Fast Fred pointed out the difference of quality resides on the marinisation job done by the OEM. By themselves the engines are very sturdy and good boys. And I have heard only good things about them.

    Unhappily Isuzu has a policy of working only with OEM and it's not friendly with people as archis, engineers and customers. No hope of an answer from them, you have to pass through the OEM. But there is some company in Findland that makes marinisation kits for this engine. Sorry of not being more precise.

    Yanmar is pratically equivalent in quality and the company is closer to the final customer and designer/engineer. After making my counts about the price, time, work and hassles of marinisation of a diesel engine (I made the trial...) I stay with Yanmar. Reasonnably priced, good engine, 2000 hours warranty in commercial use, good service.

    I agree with Mr d'Artois: Volvo no good. Very bad experiences with them. It's the equivalent of Mercruiser in the same market, so you can expect the same quality. I have heard very bad reports about the Mercruiser diesels, but I have not documented facts.

    European Ford diesel may be good for pleasure boats (see Lancel) but now the final price becomes too close to a Yanmar. So it seems to me it's no worth.

    The GM based diesel marine engines seem not to be good. I got very bad reports about unreliability from France and England about 3 different brands. It's the engine which have major flaws.
     
  4. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Brian
    We have used the Isuzu C240 for years , this is the most reliable workhorse at the lower Kw range that I know of. We are lucky in having a good marine conversion parts manufacturer (Diecon) in Australia. The C240 is an industrial engine. I have helped with conversions of Isuzu lighter automotive engines and they have been very successful.

    My own experience of Volvo has been a good quality product if fresh water cooled. Unfortunately their parts are prohibitively expensive.

    A good source for marinising kits is the English firm Lancing Marine.
     
  5. Wynand N
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: South Africa

    Wynand N Retired Steelboatbuilder

    I don't know elsewhere, but over here commercial Isuzu diesel engines are damn expensive to repair / overall.
    This was the very reason I got rid of my two Isuzu diesel ldv's for something else.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2005
  6. Joe Winkler
    Joined: May 2005
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    Location: Louisiana USA

    Joe Winkler Junior Member

    I am rebuilding a wooden sailboat -- John Alden design -- 43 ft length, 14 ft beam. Deck is long leaf pine, hull is cypress. Engine is an Isuzu C240 diesel. I bought a used C240 on eBay; however, the engine arrived in more parts than I expected. Does anyone know where I can get a shop manual for an Isuzu C240 engine so I can put the engine together? I have never worked on diesel engines, so I need a manual with training wheels attached.
     

  7. BillyDoc
    Joined: May 2005
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    Location: Pensacola, Florida

    BillyDoc Senior Member

    If you want to see a pretty diesel engine . . .

    Take a look at a Hino truck engine sometime (diesel). Actually owned and made by Toyota, they have that Toyota quality and then some. I've had an Isuzu truck as well, and there is no comparison quality-wise. Isuzu is (mostly) owned by GM, after all, and American quality never seems to comes close to Japanese quality. The Hino would be wonderful in a boat as they have LOTS of low end torque (red-line is at 2700 RPM).
     
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