Is the ocean broken?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    You and Dictator Potato Soup Brain.
    "Papers! Where are your papers?!"
    <scoff>
     
  2. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    We're keeping tabs on your bunch's spending. Some Tuesday, the accumulated debt will be presented and due, Wimpy.
     
  3. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    That seems to be the case more often than not. Always a good idea to believe it hasn't ALL been accounted for.

    -Will
     
  4. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Tuesday works for me :)

    It's virtually impossible for everything to be accounted for. The big question is whether we have enough information to reliably guide us now?
     
  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    The Arctic is greening, but not enough to help climate change
    • While the Arctic is growing greener with climate change, scientists warn that it is not greening fast enough to absorb very much carbon dioxide
    • Much of the carbon isn't actually staying stored in the plants because of increased fires due to warming climate and timber harvests at boreal latitudes
    • What we estimate is that 430 million metric tons of biomass has accumulated over the last 31 years -- but across this domain it would've been nearly double if it weren't for these fires and harvests that are keeping it down"
    The study was published in Nature Climate Change
     
  6. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    CSU researchers predicting above-average 2021 Atlantic hurricane season
    The CSU Tropical Meteorology Project team is predicting 17 named storms during the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Of those, researchers expect eight to become hurricanes and four to reach major hurricane strength (Saffir/Simpson category 3-4-5) with sustained winds of 111 miles per hour or greater.

    The tropical Pacific currently has weak La Niña conditions, that is, water temperatures are somewhat cooler than normal in the eastern and central tropical Pacific. While these waters may warm slightly during the next few months, CSU does not currently anticipate El Niño for the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season. El Niño tends to increase upper-level westerly winds across the Caribbean into the tropical Atlantic, tearing apart hurricanes as they try to form.

    While the tropical Atlantic currently has water temperatures near their long-term averages, the warmer-than-normal subtropical Atlantic typically forces a weaker subtropical high and associated weaker winds blowing across the tropical Atlantic. These conditions then lead to warmer waters in the tropical Atlantic for the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season.

    The team predicts that 2021 hurricane activity will be about 140 percent of the average season. By comparison, 2020’s hurricane activity was about 170 percent of the average season.

    Probability of major hurricanes making landfall:
    • 69% for the entire U.S. coastline (average for the last century is 52%)
    • 45% for the U.S. East Coast including the Florida peninsula (average for the last century is 31%)
    • 44% for the Gulf Coast from the Florida panhandle westward to Brownsville (average for the last century is 30%)
    • 58% for the Caribbean (average for the last century is 42%)
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    A small green rock's warning about our future

    [​IMG]
    An extraordinary journey: The atomic make-up of small crystals in the rock reveals its origin
    • It is a dropstone, a piece of ice-rafted debris recovered off the coast of modern-day West Antarctica
    • It came from the Ellsworth Mountains - some 1,300km from where the rock was found
    • Being fragile, it's highly unlikely a rock like this could survive being drug so far under an ice sheet to get to the coast
    • It's age, from the mid-Pliocene, about three million years ago, suggests an answer
    • That was the last time the atmosphere had the same concentration of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide as now
    • Temperatures were 2-3 degrees warmer than now, and sea-levels possibly 10-20m greater than now
    • The Ellsworth Mountains would have been coastal mountains, not inland mountains
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Possibly? You're not sure? Why bother?
     
  10. Dejay
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    Dejay Senior Newbie

    With the 8 to 12C we're heading towards (12-18C on land and more in extremes), that might be where future generation will live.
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Might? Might not? Why bother?
     
  12. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Plastic pollution in the deep sea: A geological perspective
    • Plastic is now found everywhere in nature, and one of the most recent and visible effects is in the oceans
    • Nano- and microplastics are ingested with the food and water, and absorbed into the flesh of organisms
    • Some plastics can survive for >1000 years on land, but it is not known how long they last in ocean trenches that are deep, dark, cold, and at high pressure
    [​IMG]
    Pollutants, including plastic, reach deep-sea fans through linked sediment routing systems,
    as well as from outside the associated catchment(s), via near-shore and shelfal currents
    (i.e., littoral cells), eolian transport, surface currents, and direct input from oceanic sources
    such as shipping and fishing. Modified from Hessler and Fildani (2019).

    The article was published in Geology

    See also Deep-sea plastic accumulations by turbidity currents: NW South China sea
     
  13. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    We have cacooned ourselves in plastic. We wear it in the form of nylon, rayon, polyester, we store our food in it, we cook with plastic utensils, we use it in filters for air and water and it is aerosolized in the air we breath.

    The real question is what, if humans have been living this intimately with plastics for multiple generations, will be the effects?

    -Will
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2021
  14. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    China dumped that plastic garbage in the sea. Get after them to clean it up and stop dumping it.
     

  15. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    ‘Pizzly bears’: Climate change to thank for grizzly-polar bear hybrid
    • So-called “Pizzly” bears, a hybrid of polar and grizzly bear, were first spotted in the wild in 2006
    • “Usually hybrids aren’t better suited to their environments than their parents, but there is a possibility that these hybrids might be able to forage for a broader range of food sources”
    • "We don’t know yet, but perhaps the intermediate skull of the pizzly could confer a biomechanical advantage.”
    • The number of polar bears in the wild are expected to decrease 30% over the next 3 decades
     
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