Is the Egoist buildable?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by ninepound, Aug 3, 2009.

  1. ninepound
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    ninepound Junior Member

    Hello everybody,

    My name's Evan and I have crazy ambitions of building a boat. I've stumbled across pages of boat plans and the one that keeps (inexplicably) catching my eye is the Egoist. The site is falling apart at the seams and reference to any form of a completed boat is nowhere to be found, but surely it's been done. The paper model is quite doable. :p Is this actually a buildable boat? Would it make a suitable first-time build? If not, can anyone point me in the direction of a similar, more possible, hopefully free, ship?

    Thanks in advance,

    Evan the Aspiring Shipwright
     
  2. bistros

    bistros Previous Member


    Evan:

    Anything is buildable - what matters is that it be safe and sailable after building. There are lots of good designs out there to build - and if saving $2-300 on the design is critical to your effort, don't bother starting. Boat building is not a spendthrift activity, as your work product generally has to be capable of keeping you alive, sometimes in conditions that are challenging.

    If you are beginning, and want to reach a successful conclusion to your first project, I'd suggest a well designed, tested and simple project like the Chesapeake Light Craft "Pocketship". Building plans are under $300, and there are videos and a couple hundred page illustrated manual to help you along. This type of project is designed exactly for people starting out.

    I'm sure there are lots of designers here that have produced similar designs targeted at low experience builders - ask how many have been built, go see and sail one, and talk to local people sailing in your venue about local requirements. If you can't talk to current owners about their likes, dislikes and experiences building a design, do not bother. Being the first build of a design isn't what you want for a project.

    --
    Bill
     
  3. ninepound
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    ninepound Junior Member

    Thank you for your thorough response -- please believe me, I have no intentions of taking this build lightly. Safety (and sailability for that matter) are utmost priorities -- I was merely looking for more resources and documentation before undertaking a potentially costly build. My budget is not infinite but if it is more practical to purchase plans, an extra $300 is certainly not out of the question. And thank you for the PocketShip reference, I will definitely look into it further.
     
  4. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    What you have appears to be a side view that looks a lot like a Cornish Shrimper (a popular 19 ft sailboat).
    Falling in love with a side view is quite normal, like falling in love with a bank teller at the drive-thru. Until you go into the bank lobby one day and see her gigantic behind.
    The trouble is, you have no idea what lies within the real original design. It may not be a viable reality. It may be a gigantic "***". It may not even sail properly due to many issues. It appears to be a standing lug sail rig with an unusual extra spar. It's not bad looking. But what can you do? A sailboat is far more than a side view.
     
  5. ninepound
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    ninepound Junior Member

    Ha, thanks for the wonderful analogy. I was afraid that I was only attracted to just the image -- which was why I came here seeking additional info on the boat. Now, however, it seems like the Egoist is not the wisest choice, and I am gladly welcoming alternative suggestions; everyone here definitely has more experience with the matter than I do. Is a 15' boat like the PocketShip too ambitious for my first time? Would I be better off starting out with a small one sheet skiff or dinghy?
     
  6. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Now you're talking. The Pocket ship is a kit, I think. I happen to own a boat of exactly the same length, though it's a lot heavier, and it's very handy--- big enough to take out a ways without fear, smasll enough to trailer easily to new waters.
    800 lbs is substantial enough, however, for inshore cruising since the boat is configured as a cruiser and would be relatively safe with the hatch closed.
    I don't think a smaller boat need be built first, as the boat is plywood and pretty simple construction.
    You would get help here too.
     
  7. ninepound
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    ninepound Junior Member

    The PocketShip seemed to be available as both a kit and plans+manual. I still have inhibitions about this boat. While I'm sure it seems simple for you, it is still very daunting to me. I hope to one day become a very avid and proficient sailor, but I'm afraid that day is probably not my senior year of high school - baby steps. I feel I might be more comfortable with an even simpler design, like a 10' or 12', no frills sharpie-like dinghy retrofitted to carry a sail. I don't necessarily need a cabin that comfortably and safely seats two -- I have no desire to weather a storm just yet. And I may be stuck cartopping for a while.

    Or should I just bite the bullet and go with the more advanced and more rewarding build?
     
  8. Chris Ostlind

    Chris Ostlind Previous Member


    This is hilarious, Alan.

    The same issue holds true for TV News anchor women.
     
  9. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    It may be where the term "anchor person" comes from.
     
  10. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    well, no. You shouldn't be getting into anything too difficult until you are ready. Check out some designs and report back if you want some critique.
     
  11. bistros

    bistros Previous Member

    Before you go much further, taking a few minutes to tell us what you want to accomplish and sail would be useful. I steered you towards the PocketShip because your original post showed a plywood homebuild trailer sailor that was around 16-18 feet long. There is a lot of difference between the Egoist and a small 10 - 12' sharpie design!

    Narrowing the field will help the people here better help you. As far as complexity and difficulty goes, as long as you are aiming at stitch & tape designs, there is little difficulty difference between 8 feet long and 20 feet long - but there is a lot of cost difference. I certainly would not consider the PocketShip-level design as challenging in comparison to a carvel or clinker planked traditional framed build. Even a strongback cedar stripped canoe build is more complicated than a stitch & tape.

    There are some brilliant stitch & tape dory designs that could get you on the water quickly and teach you a lot of skills.

    --
    Bill
     
  12. ninepound
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    ninepound Junior Member

    Right -- I'm sorry I didn't do this earlier. I suppose I was turned on to the Egoist because it could (I'm assuming) perform all the functions I would have wanted it for now and then some when I become more confident and proficient. And I still chickened out when you gave me exactly what I asked for. Sorry about that.

    I'm looking for a boat easy enough to learn on, but hardy enough to last a while and grow into. We have a comfy 22 acre lake locally and a much larger, much more sailing-friendly Lake Texoma a half hour's drive away. A trailer is not out of the question. Large enough to, when I feel confident enough to keep myself alive, take a friend or family or two out for a day on the lake. And hopefully, affordable enough to let me go to college. :p

    My assumption (please correct me if I'm wrong) was that a day sailor would be more than suitable for this, if anything, a little overkill, but would also allow me the freedom to go coastal later down the path. Whereas with a small dory or dinghy would limit me (safely and comfortably) to the local lakes. Is this the wrong approach? In your opinion, should I build what I am capable of sailing to its full potential now and wait for a more specialized craft like a day sailor when I can use it, or be ambitious and build for the future?
     
  13. bistros

    bistros Previous Member

    I'd consider building something smaller than a day sailor - you need a learning platform, and you could build five or six small stitch & tape dinghies for the cost of one day sailor. Build it, learn how to sail it well, and you'll be able to sell it when you are done. Once you've got some experience at building and sailing, you will have a much better idea of what you want to do next - and you won't have spent a fortune to find out what works for you.

    Lots of people take small open boats camping and weekending - a two person sharpie or dory is a fine boat for learning to build, learning to sail and learning what you enjoy.

    Start small, spend small and learn lots. There are lots of designers on this forum, amateur and professional who have designs suitable. Check out Duckworks as well.

    --
    Bill
     
  14. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Take a look at Joel White's Nutshell Pram. Available either 7ft or 9 ft, stitch and glue or taped seam... I forget (but shapely), good performance dinghy, can be built to sail, easy enough for a first build. easy to sell when moving up.
     

  15. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    Smaller boats are more responsive and better to learn in I think, you know what your are doing wrong real fast. You might find a local club or rec dept sailing class and get some time in other peoples' boats. That way you learn more about what you like and do not like, better equipping you for your first choice in boats.

    You can buy a used boat off craig's list real cheap (cheaper than building your own) and fix it up and get some time in it too. Sell when you are ready to move up, or build.

    Good luck.
     
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