Is Six10 epoxy blush free?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Canracer, Jan 25, 2015.

  1. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    Does anyone know if West System's Six10 thickened epoxy cures blush free?
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  2. pauloman
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    pauloman Epoxy Vendor

    more important is what is is filled or thickened with - possible trash so that it will mix in the $10 static mixing nozzle/caulking tube. probably thickened with fumed silica. Keep ibn mind that is an 10 oz caulking tube - less than 8% of a gallon of epoxy - at what price?

    better to use a kevlar/cermaic epoxy adhesive and buy a few $4 re-fillable cauking tubes. google wet dry 700 epoxy - which would cost about $14 for 10 oz in a caulking tube (and could be applied underwater)

    paul oman - progressive epoxy polymers
     
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  3. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    I payed dearly for that stuff ($24,) and was taken by surprise when it only dispensed 190mls.

    I'm sure the thickener will do the job although, I do wish I knew what was in there.
     
  4. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    Just a guess but I'd also say it's thickened with fumed silica, that's been wet out extremely well. It's impossible to get results like that at home with a plastic pot and a stir stick.

    The epoxy and silica combos that I've tried to mix, resulted in little dry clumps of silica suspended in epoxy. It looked bad and was also brittle.
     
  5. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    It looks like 10 ounces of thickened epoxy, but the tube only dispenses about 6.3 ounces (4.9% of a gallon.)

    It starts dispensing at the finger, it stops dispensing at the thumb (see the hash mark under my thumb.)
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  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's no such thing as blush free epoxy, even if it's formulated to be blush free. This assumes the average back yard builder's shop and skill sets, of course. With some experience and environmental control, you can work in a blush free environment. So, talk to the other half about why you need to install air conditioning in the garage, next to the dust control unit you've just hung on the ceiling.

    As I've mentioned previously (countless times), pre-mixes are costly as hell, once you realize what you're paying for. In the past week, I have mixed a lot of adhesive goo, for a small project I'm doing. Total cost is about $60, which net me a little more then a gallon of goo, with the related fill materials. 6.4 ounces at $3.75 per ounce is really painful and close to $500 a gallon, if my in head math is working right. A damn expensive convenience if you ask me.

    I don't think (could be wrong) 6-ten is blush free. In fact, I think they use their 105/200 series resin/harden combinations, which surely can't be confused with a blush free formulation.
     
  7. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    It might be made from their G/Flex style of epoxies ( it's thickened G/Flex.) The hardener they use for G/Flex is branded and sold as 650 hardener. It would make sense that it's used in the Six10 product (610.) All guesses boys, just throwing ideas out there.

    This 4.75 gallon container of 650 retails for $820, add the cost of resin and it starts to make sense why 190mls is priced at $24 (West marine.)
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  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    $172 a gallon for the 5 gallon bucket of G-Flex. Damn, I'll continue to make my own thank you. My understanding of this line of goos is they're the same base resin and a different hardener of course with a different set of modifiers.
     
  9. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    I spoke to tech. support at West System this morning. They said that Six10 could cure with a slight blush and, a water wash followed by a light sanding is the correct way to proceed.

    They also said that 105 resin and the Special Clear 207 hardener will also cure with a slight blush depending on temperature and humidity.
     
  10. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    That's only the hardener. You'll want some resin with that.

    Only $455 for this 4.75gal container.
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  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can see how often I use West products.
     
  12. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    All of the usual suspects in marine grade epoxy, will do a fine job of polyester repair (better then polyester).
     
  14. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    Do you mean boats made of polyester resin and fiberglass cloth? Yeah I'm convinced that epoxy is better, any day of the week.

    These kayaks are polyethylene and polypropylene. There is no catalyzed resin, it's a material similar to recycled soda bottles.
     

  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Polyethylene and polypropylene can be tough to bond to, but there are specific epoxy and other adhesives formulations and techniques that can greatly improve a bond, though above I was referring to polyester, of which plenty of canoes and kayaks are made.
     
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