Is power catamaran capsize safer than sail catamaran?

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by gp333, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. gp333
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    gp333 Junior Member

    Is power catamaran capsize safer than sail catamaran?

    I believe yes, but wish ask more experienced here...
     
  2. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    They say yes, power is less likely to capsize.

    Why?

    First of all, you can't have a wind induced capsize from too much sail up in windy conditions. This is the most common reason for catamaran capsize.

    Second, you have a lot of weight down low in the form of engines and fuel. In addition to the dimensional stability of the two widely spaced hulls, this gives you even a bit better of a righting moment from weight distribution as well. A sailing cat, in most instances, will have a center of mass that is a bit higher up than a power cat.
     
  3. gp333
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    gp333 Junior Member

    And if power catamaran capsize, he stay capsized too? Or hard sea can alone latter back him in normal position
    maybe?
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If any catamaran capsizes it's a bad day, power or sail. Neither recover very well and no they will not "self recover" without the assistance of a big crane or hurricane whipped seas.
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It depends on the design. The method of propulsion alone is not enough to determine an answer.
     
  6. eyschulman
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    eyschulman Senior Member

    What Gonzo says gatta be true- I have seen some power cats with so much freeboard and house area you might as well have a sail you can't take down.
     
  7. gp333
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    gp333 Junior Member

  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    There isn't a tradition on power catamarans yet, they are new-comers.
     
  9. gp333
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    gp333 Junior Member

    yes, but planet solar is extremely "new-commer"

    any ideas about his hard sea stability?
     

  10. sandy daugherty
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    sandy daugherty Senior Member

    Ask anyone from Kansas; barn doors do fly. So this example is probably not the best way to survive heavy weather. I suspect only an enclosed, self propelled life boat, painted international orange is the best bet.

    Add another consideration to your powercat question; beam. There are examples of production powercats with beams narrow enough to fit in a large slip. They may be two or more stories high ( but none to my knowledge have elevators or escalators YET.)

    Others may not have enough power to keep the bows into the wind in a stiff blow.

    The last consideration is training. I'm sure that anyone who can carry a 4 x 8 foot piece of 3/4" plywood on his head across a frozen lake in a blizzard could handle that PlanetSolar very-nearly-a-trimaran in a blow.

    Naval architects use a related term, Metacenter, to talk about this problem. It's not hard to come up with.

    Gonzo: I'm looking at a powercat built in 1962. Isn't 50 old enough?
     
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