Is a Naval Architect best way resource?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Kirbynoworries, Jun 9, 2020.

  1. Kirbynoworries
    Joined: Jan 2016
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    Location: Florida

    Kirbynoworries Junior Member

    I have found a Naval Archetict that says he can get my vessel certified for 12 pax .He thinks the scope of work will be somewhere between 12 to 15 k .
    ANY thoughts on price or if this can be done
     
  2. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    What calculations or studies, what documentation in summary, are included in this certification/price?
     
  3. Kirbynoworries
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    Kirbynoworries Junior Member

    Proposal
     

    Attached Files:

  4. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    If the CG accepts the structure as it is, without further justification, the price in post #31 seems very high to me and if it does not accept it, it is better that you forget about the boat because I see no way to demonstrate the composition of the laminate and demonstrate that it complies with the current requirements for GRP constructions.
     
  5. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Perhaps it should be mentioned to Kirbynoworries that TANSL is in Spain and may not have any experience with USCG regulations and practices. TANSL please correct me if you have worked on projects involving the USCG.
     
  6. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Michigan Maritime Museum had the Lindy Lou, an electric launch originally built as an uninspected vessel (maximum of 6 passengers), approved by the US Coast Guard for 12 passengers. https://www.michiganmaritimemuseum.org/explore/our-fleet/lindy-lou/ The builder of the hull cooperated. My understanding is the major concern was meeting the stability requirements with the awning in place. I measured the boat and provided a lines drawing for use in stability calculations to a designer/naval architect who was assisting the museum. Added: I believe the Lindy Lou is limited by the USCG to the Black River which is very sheltered.
     
  7. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Yes, years ago I have worked on passenger ships that had to comply with the USCG and the US Public Health. Which does not mean, far from it, that I know the CG's twists and turns. So, although I don't know why you say it, it is very possible that you are right in what you mean, that I don't know what it is.
    Although I am not an expert at the USCG, I still believe that it is a high price for the jobs described. I do not think that the demands of one entity or another will raise the price, for example, of stability calculations or the creation of a bilge scheme.
     
  8. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    The quote you mention, for that scope, is low!
     
  9. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Ha ha ha, @Ad Hoc, you always such a joker. The only problem is that your "little joke", motivated by an excessive desire to question any comment of mine, can lead Kirbynoworries to pay an exaggerated price for that work.
    When a designer creates a new design of a boat, he assumes the responsibility that his design complies, in the best possible way, with the initial SOR of the project. The designer must create shapes that ensure the good behavior at sea of his design, stability, security for passage, compliance with international standards, ... The designer assumes a responsibility that does not expire over the years. In general, in any type of job, more is paid for the responsibility assumed than for the number of hours spent on it. This is why an experienced designer can have higher rates, because it better guarantees that his project is the most suitable.
    In the case we are dealing with, that responsibility does not exist and, therefore, there is no reason to pay for it. You only have to pay for the hours of work of a technician who does not even have to be a naval architect. Of course, he should be used to handling the regulations of the USCG and, if possible, have good relations, fluid dialogue, with the local inspection of the CG.
    I say all this to try to justify my opinion that the price offered is high, because the responsibility in the project is nil.
    Any other "joke" about it will be celebrated as it deserves.
     

  10. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    A different way of looking at the price: How much would you pay to trade in your existing boat and receive a similar boat except certified for 12 passengers?
     
    Barry likes this.
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