Investigating hull rot, 350lb list

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Businessjeff, May 3, 2019.

  1. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 523
    Likes: 78, Points: 28
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    I'm having a bit of trouble following your posted questions. I hope I cover most of them.

    Stringers are structural. Shelving rarely. However, sometimes structural elements are incorporated into the interior furnishings.

    Marine grade plywood would last far longer than exterior grade plywood. Interior grade plywood will fail very quickly. Don't waste your time using inferior interior plywood.

    Screw holes and failed tabbing are the most common causes of water ingress.

    Your grinding surface preparation looks spot on.

    There appears to be some air trapped within your new tabbing. Try more resin or less pressure on the bubble buster roller. I also don't see any fillit in the inside corners.

    Are you going to refill with foam?

    Only 250 pounds left on the diet.
     
  2. tpenfield
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 144
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Cape Cod, MA

    tpenfield Senior Member

    Thanks for the pictures. Keep them coming. In the video you show water in the floor, which I assume is in the area of the aft berth. (right?) So, there is certainly more water to be had, as per my comment about chasing problems about 12 feet forward on my boat.

    Your repair work so far looks to be on the starboard side from the engine mount stringer outward towards the chine of the hull and a bit forward towards the aft cabin bulkhead (right?)

    The wood structure in your photos does not look too good. You mentioned it was 'swollen' . . . which means wet. It looks wet and dark. Once water gets into the hull chambers the wood absorbs it and it goes throughout adjoining members. So, to your question, the water will not just be in the foam, it will be in the wood too. I cannot imagine that repair tabbing/glass work will adhere to any of the wood that is even slightly wet. There is just no way it can bond.

    So, have you closed up the fuel tank shelf at this point or is it still just the plywood covering? BTW - any APA rated 'Exterior' plywood will be fine for the repair. The better grades if you can get it. I had to shop around for the plywood on my repairs. HD had a lot of 'Exposure1' rated plywood, which is not good enough . . . got to be 'Exterior'. I finally found some at Lowes.


    How does the port side of the engine bay look? Is that heading in the same direction as the starboard side?

    Post more pictures when you can.

    BTW, you can probably do the glass work, it is not rocket science.
     
  3. Businessjeff
    Joined: May 2019
    Posts: 13
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Mi

    Businessjeff Junior Member

    Port side in engine bilge is mirrored. I didnt bother opening it up, the shelf was solid. Also port side is not the side with weight.

    Id like to open up the floor and at least remove dead weight. Maybe do repairs at the end of the season, let things dry out, be able to see if water is still getting in.

    My only hesitation is if the shelfing in the cabin reinforce the stringers.

    From what i can tell. The engine stringers terminate at the bulkhead. However im sure new stringers start just on the other side carrying up the bottom of the hull
     
  4. Businessjeff
    Joined: May 2019
    Posts: 13
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Mi

    Businessjeff Junior Member

    Oh to answer, yes i glassed in my repair. I did not do and chining as thats how it’s designed. Acts as a water channel.

    I used poly resin iirc. I painted it with bilge koat. The paint did not adhear, i thought you could paint directly over poly with no prep
     

  5. tpenfield
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 144
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Cape Cod, MA

    tpenfield Senior Member

    Was the resin not fully cured when you applied the bilgecoat?

    Got any pictures of the current status?

    I think you should stick a wet-vac (shop vacuum) in the hole of the aft berth where you have standing water in the foam, and see how much water you can pull from that location. It may take hours of running the shop vac and several repeats a few days apart, as more water will seek that location. Make sure the shop vac is pulling some air, else you will wear it out quickly.
     
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