"Inspired" by gas prices...

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by die_dunkelheit, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    First you have to change the American mentality. I just watched two local sport fisherman head out in a boat powered by a 40 hp motor. In the US a fisherman needs a minimum of 200hp to catch a few Bass. With cars its the same. A real patriotic American needs a V8 and gun racks to go down to the market. 40, 50 ,60 mile per gallon cars have been around for a long time. Consider sq meters of family living space...in the US its huge. Look at the GDP of the US vs energy use then compare to Germany or Japan.

    In the US conservation of resources like petroleum is thought of as crazy foreign socialist idea attacking freedom.
     
  2. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Petros Senior Member

    well you would be wrong. In a previous career I have spend many hours on engine dynomometers measuring exactly where all the fuel energy goes, and I have measured the amount of energy in fuel. I know as much as anyone in the country on this topic, you can not get something for nothing. All of the outlandish claims are bogus.

    This guy is either a crank or a fraud, it is not possible. I have measure the amount of energy it takes to push a car at 60 mph, a car that size would take about 50 hp to maintain cruising speed if it was real low drag and had low resistance tires. If it were physically possible to convert gasoline 100 percent into to hp (which would violate all kinds of laws of physics), a car that big would only get about 60 mpg (gasoline has about 133000 btu/gallon). With real physics involved in a real world, they are likely getting at best about 25 mpg. There is no conspiracy here, it is just not possible to push that much metal around for that little energy consumption. I have nothing to gain here by pushing propaganda, I have not worked in the automotive industry for over 30 years and have nothing to do with it now.

    This is the language of ignorant conspiracy theory kooks. Fuel injection is a far more precise and accurate way to control mixture than any carburetor ever was. I have assisted in designing both systems, EFI is Superior is every way. The economy killers is the often stupid Federal requirements for both fuel formulations, emissions standards (which are not determined my engineers or scientists for the cleanest air, but by lobbying). All of the stupid and heavy crap that has to go in modern cars, like the 9 or 10 worthless airbags (which do not help safety much, and cause injuries themselves), 5 mph bumpers (proven to add weight and cost, not save money), all to make profits for some company with a patent on some "safety" invention. Plus most Americans like large cars, again all that weight and size costs fuel to push around. Every time we get used to fuel costs, we start buying larger and larger cars again. But all of the federal requirements makes the smallest car you can buy in the US weight about 2600 lbs. I have owned cars that weight in at about 1200 lbs, the 60 mpg old honda CRX only weighed 1700 lbs. You can not buy cars that light anymore. The problem is market demand and stupid requirements.

    I like smaller cars and would rather save my fuel costs than drive some monster truck around for the 2 or 3 times a year I actually need it.

    Do not believe the ignorant rants of people who know nothing about the design of engines or cars, or how the feds continue to screw us with crappy gasoline and high prices. That will not change until the self serving incompetents in Washington DC are voted out.
     
  3. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    most australian taxis run on lpg gas. it is common for them to do a million km plus before engine replacement. the gas keeps the internals clean plus they don't have many cold starts. ford australia sell a dedicated lpg model which is very popular. the trouble here is there are subsidys to get as many cars as possible running on lpg , but now the ******** are raising gas prices all the time so they can increase their revenue. gas used to be really cheap before. there are some kenworth trucks in town here that are running on compressed natural gas but are not very impressive, when they come to hill the system switchs back to diesel. i filled my work vehicle today and it cost $85.00 for 56.71 liters and i do this 3 to 4 times some weeks.
     
  4. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    well I appreciate the input but I'd hesitate to discount the possibilities until I'd calculated the total amount of energy it took to push x mas x far and then compared that to the total energy in a gallon of gas. It seems like the possibilities wouldn't be that hard to calculate. I watched a documentary from last year, it was called Gashole. In which they interview a whole bunch of people including the author of a book on the subject originally published by Shell. Which I quoted earlier. These guys have been experimenting with high mileage vehicles longer than either of us have been alive. Or at least a lot longer than I have.

    I'm OK with being corrected but simply haranguing my statements without showing the numbers isn't real convincing

    Also you might look into the history of the oil and gas industry. Who Killed the Electric Car is a great documentary that researches the machinations of an industry bent on squeezing as much out of the public as possible. Its only paranoia if they're not after your wallet.

    oh and my next project is a pyrolysis system. But in there somewhere will be a smaller vehicle. The 250 was always intended as a work truck and it doubles as a fuel collection vehicle.

    cheers
    B
     
  5. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    I can't see very light cars being very popular while they have to share the
    same roads (or lanes) as large heavy vehicles.

    Personally, I go everywhere I need in taxis or hire cars. I couldn't be bothered
    having a lump of metal in the driveway that I have to register, insure, maintain etc and only rarely use.
     
  6. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I dont own a car. I'm not unusual,many people here don't own a car. With fewer personal cars society adapts. Better public transport, many taxis . Fewer big box stores and more smaller supermarkets, hardware stores...
    For marine supplies small companies spring up to work the waterfront as purchasing agent...order in the morning and you get your hydraulic oil and lip seals by afternoon. Owning a car is an expensive hassle..when the time comes that a car is needed I rent one...do my duty..then give it back.
     
  7. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    Way back in my drinking days, I used to go out, get drunk, get a taxi home,
    then a taxi back to pick up the car when I was sober. I decided (at age 19)
    that there was a cheaper way. :)
     
  8. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    What does a car cost operate ? 8 or 10 grand a year ? times 50 or sixty years. Big wedge of cash
     
  9. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    A fairly average car here costs about $30,000 and about $120 per week to register, insure, and run. It might be higher now.
    The great "hidden" cost is that it devalues the minute you buy it.

    In any case, how can you learn anything about politics if you never catch a cab? ;)
     
  10. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    yikes 8 or 10 k a year, what kinda car are you driving. I pay cash for any car I buy and after that I turn all my own wrenches. Costs me maybe 2 or 3 k a year including tires and fuel. Although I mostly make my own fuel as well.

    I could own a bloody Rolls for 10k a year mate
     
  11. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Sadly, this is the one time that Michael's wild and crazy stereotypes about the USA are completely correct.

    I also have to agree with Michael. We own cars right now because we are on land to build and we need them for that purpose. My wife has a very old Hyundai with 20mpg. I have a sprinter rv/caravan I built and live in at the build site. We will be selling both as soon as the boat is complete.
     
  12. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    ya that was kinda a grim truth
     
  13. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    There was an interview with Bob Ford ? Family of Ford Motors and he stated that at present there are about one billion motor vehicles in operation around the world. At current projections this will grow to 4 billion in 40 years. Ford stated that 4 billion vehicles is not sustainable even with vast infrastructure improvements and that the only possible strategy will be to rearrange society around mass transit.
     
  14. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Your opening sentence is hilarious. You'll never change the American (and by that I'll assume you mean USA) mentality. It has to change on it's own.
    Change the American mentality, you may as well try and change the law of gravity.

    -Tom
     

  15. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Sure you can change a mentality...Flower Power 60s to the Steroid millennium. Its a slow media campaign, but it works
     
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