Inflatable leak

Discussion in 'Materials' started by valvebounce, Oct 2, 2016.

  1. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 524
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    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    It did work,it's a patience job rolling the diluted pva around the tubes,they need the pva pouring in,an then the tubes pumping up.
    You need to keep rolling the boat over and over to ensure the pva covers the inside.
    You may see pva coming out of the leaks,which is a good thing.Eventually,the pva sets,and blocks the leaks.
    You will probably find that the outer skin has UV damage,and is slightly perished,A bit of a sand down to get the 'Dead skin' off
    before you paint will help.
    The pva idea is the same as the aerosols that are used to fix car tyres with slow punctures.Where mag alloy wheels leak through the castings,it fills in the
    leaks on those as well.
    Seeing as pva is quite cheap,it's a good idea to use plenty.
    Hope this helps,let us know how you get on.
    PS-- keep the boat pumped up after you have put the pva in.The tubes need to be fully inflated so the pva can find the leaks.
     
  2. KoruCaptain
    Joined: Wednesday
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    Location: Crofton, BC

    KoruCaptain New Member

    Super,
    I figure a combination of the PVA from the inside... and then a coating of 'protectant' on t outside should see me sorted. It's only the one tube... the other goes soft due to the other deflating, however, I'll likely do both as a preemptive. I am thinking, as you mentioned... that seeing the PVA solution come through the fabric can only be a good thing. Of course rotating the tubes is going to be fun. How long did you keep the rotations up for? and how long between turning... or was it a constant state for a period of time? I was a bit concerned that the PVA may not set, with no air movement for it to "evaporate off" from. I remember PVA having a degree of flexibility once cured too, so I'm quite hopeful. Did you stick with the 3:1 ratio? (I think that's what you mentioned)
    I'll let you know how I got on for sure.

    Cheers... and thanks for the similar thought process.
     
  3. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    I come from an industrial painting background.

    Beware of PVA!!

    There are several types of PVA sold to variance niche paint markets. They are NOT the same.
    Was Poly Vinyl Acetate or P.V. Acrylic or P.V. Alcohol or P.V. Ammoline used?
    And which set of vinyls was used?
     
  4. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 524
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    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    You're welcome.The PVA I used was building trade PVA,and of course,water based.I stuck to the 3 to 1 mix.
    My boat has an inflating process,tube one first,then tube two.I think tube one extends into tube two internally,Not very far,but I think tube one is supposed to inflate a little way inside tube two before you inflate it.
    I turned the boat over about every 20 minutes for about 2 hours.The PVA that leaks out solidifies in the leak.The stuff left inside eventually sets.
    I have used the same process on trailer and wheelbarrow tyres as a temporary fix.
    I use the PVA on internal porous walls as a sealer before wallpapering.Also in sand and cement mortar before pointing brickwork.(3 water to 1 pva)
    I think once the PVA has set in the leaks on the boat,you could regard it as fixed,but adding a sealing external coat of paint/sealer on the outside of the tubes makes a more permanent fix.Removing the UV damaged surface of the boat will give you a good base for the external paint/sealer.Painting/sealing over a damaged surface will just flake or peel off.
    Good luck with it,and happy boat flipping,Haha.
     
  5. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 524
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    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    I don't really know the chemical makeup,but it is the same as builders use,and can be diluted with water.I use it before decorating internally as a sealer/size on porous walls.
     
  6. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 774
    Likes: 148, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Then it was PVAcetate.

    Don't worry you are not the only one who doesn't realize that there multitude products labeled as pva
     
  7. KoruCaptain
    Joined: Wednesday
    Posts: 4
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    Location: Crofton, BC

    KoruCaptain New Member

    I looked up the Material Data Sheet for the product we purchased. It is PVA (Polyvinyl acetate (PVA, PVAc, poly(ethenyl ethanoate): best known as wood glue, white glue, carpenter's glue, school glue, Elmer's glue in the US, or PVA glue))
    DESCRIPTION: ELMERS SCHOOL GLUE
    PRODUCT TYPE: PVAC BASED ADHESIVE.
    APPLICATION: E-175

    I'm going to give it a crack today. Cheers for the comments and advice/feedback!
     
  8. KoruCaptain
    Joined: Wednesday
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    Location: Crofton, BC

    KoruCaptain New Member

    Worked like a charm! Only a few days into it. I used a 2:1 ratio as a trial on a cotton serviette had me doubting. Put about a litre of diluted solution into each tube... rolled it over every 30 mins for 1st couple hours, then every two hours or so for the next day. Cheers mate!
     

  9. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 524
    Likes: 11, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    Great,nice to hear it was successful.
    Sounds a bit cold in your neck of the woods,(googled Crofton BC)it may deflate slightly when it goes in the water,just give it a few pumps to bring it to the right pressure.If you leave it inflated overnight in the cold it will deflate slightly,it probably won't get back to pressure when the day warms up(chemical air reaction)You may have to give it a few pumps to bring it back to the right pressure.It probably won't be leaking air,it just happens in colder climates.
     
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