I'm new - looking for plans for a 16 foot aluminum boat with a tiller motor

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Mark Rush, Aug 22, 2020.

  1. Mark Rush
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Ontario Canada

    Mark Rush New Member

    Hi guys. I just signed up here. I have a growing bunch of grandkids and I need a bigger boat. I've been a metal fabber for 30 years so I do have extensive aluminum fab knowledge. I'm looking for downloadable plans for a 16 foot aluminum with a tiller motor. Any leads would be appreciated. Thanks guys
    Mark
     
  2. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 1,261
    Likes: 242, Points: 63
    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Hi Mark,

    Welcome to the forum.

    If you can describe the type of use the 16 footer would get we'll be better able to advise you on plans.
    Are you trailering, lake or ocean, water-skiing, transport, fishing, how many people... you know, stuff like that.

    One is usually much better off buying a new or used boat.
    But if you really want to fabricate one then a good design is key.
     
  3. Mark Rush
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Ontario Canada

    Mark Rush New Member

    Hi and thanks for the reply. I'm looking to build a basic deep hull open top at 16 ft. It will all be tig welded by me. It will be used for fresh water lakes in Ontario canada
     
  4. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 1,313
    Likes: 149, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 158

    Barry Senior Member

    Metalboatkits. com

    You can get a cut file for around 300 bucks Canadian, with a HIN, Hull Identification Number, for registration purposes. Without a HIN number, the process is much more difficult to register the boat as either a Home Built or Experimental
    Depending on hull shell thickness, better to Mig than Tig due to potential distortion problems with Tig (though they can be minimized)

    And there are other kit plans available from various suppliers

    While I understand the satisfaction of building a boat, for a 16 foot boat, the savings that you might see may be $2,000 - 3000. As unless you will be purchase the aluminum at wholesale prices, the cost savings may be minimal as
    compared to buying a welded hull
     
  5. Mark Rush
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Ontario Canada

    Mark Rush New Member

    Hi Barry. I plan on using 1/8 plate. I know its overkill for a 16 foot deep hull with a tiller but if it hits a rock who cares...lol. I work in a fully equipped metal fabrication shop so all the forming and shearing will be done by myself and fully tig welded in my garage. I'm buying all my aluminium for around 2000 50 series.
     
  6. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 1,244
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  7. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    1/8 inch still obliges you to have a lot of support framing, I think its a dud idea to go plate for a simple small open boat, but if my arm was twisted, I would weld some top-hat extrusions, longitudinally, externally, rather than internally. But that's a fair bit of welding, continuously welded. That way you will have only transverse frames to kick your toes on, internally.
     

  8. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 1,261
    Likes: 242, Points: 63
    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Basic sounds pretty simple.
    Which deep hull are you going to build?
     
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