I need help to learn how to make perfect vernish on our veneered honeycomb panels

Discussion in 'Materials' started by teakcell, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Laurent,
    my guys here ask me "why is he using Xylene?" "If the bonding resin bleeds through, evenly distributed, just add two more layers (green) and the race is ran" Why Xylene?
    Regards
    Richard
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Xylene isn't a bad choice, especially if you want to increase the flexibility of the cured goo. At the right temperature, it can also increase penetration, of course with the knowledge it will reduce strength and water proofness of the cured coating.

    I know what you're going through Teakcell. Those seams will suck up resin like a sponge. My technique was to apply a few coats to the seams only, to fill them, knocking down the over flow after each run. It's a pain, but the only way to level the seams with the curved veneer surface I was working with.

    Another option would be to "flood" coat the surface. This is much like how a table top is done. You literally pour on the epoxy and let it pool. I use a 1/16" notched spreader to move it around the surface, which self levels if the viscosity is correct and the resin has enough time to flow out before it kicks off.

    For panel work, I would think flood coating is the way to go.
     
  3. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    To this point my first reply should lead (post#4)! Feed more resin.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  4. robherc
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    robherc Designer/Hobbyist

    Here's a thought (possibly useless, maybe not) that just hit me:
    Why not saturate the veneer with epoxy first? That way there will be no bleed through (though, if done right, the cured bond should be as good), and there will be no "dry spots"...just evenly epoxy-soaked wood. You could probably even VIP (with flow media, of course) or vac-bag the veneer when you do this to keep from gaining too much weight from over-applying the epoxy, if weight is critical for you.
     
  5. robherc
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    robherc Designer/Hobbyist

    To All:
    In another thread, teakcell told me he uses veneer over honeycomb. If that's the case in this thread too, then I think we're talking "weight-critical" applications, and feeding more resin into the vacuum might just rapidly increase weight by filling the honeycomb with epoxy. If that's not the case here, then "feed more resin" could be exactly what the doctor (Dr. Richard?) ordered.
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Rob
    you are right, we are talking "weight-critical" applications. But the honeycomb cells are already covered by plywood to which teakcell will apply the veneer.
    So I do┬┤nt see a real prob feeding a spoon of additional resin.
    Regards
    Richard
     

  7. robherc
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    robherc Designer/Hobbyist

    OK, I guess you have more info than I do on this one...if he has already applied plywood to the honeycomb, then yes, I would say feeding a little more epoxy would prob. be the easiest way to fix the problem...do the same thing as a pre-preg. veneer, but without the extra step.
     
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