HVAC/salt air extraction

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by James Wellington, Dec 20, 2021.

  1. James Wellington
    Joined: Aug 2021
    Posts: 33
    Likes: 5, Points: 8
    Location: Nanaimo, BC.

    James Wellington Junior Member

    In all these boating forums, there have been various issues on interior air treatment discussed, but I had never seen one on whether modern hvac systems, air handlers, etc. actually extract the salt from the sea air that fills the interiors. Salt has many deliterious effects on both materials and humans, of course affecting different people to varying extents. The good news is that recently in another forum this important to some issue has been resolved decisively. Turns out the equipment exists to get your cabin air treated just the way you want it, including not only temperature, and humidity, but also salt ectraction, even to sub micron level. The research done in that forum identified about 4 companies that specialize in it. I could post that here for interested parties.
     
  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    why not...

    I am struggling with locker dehumidification.
     
  3. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  4. James Wellington
    Joined: Aug 2021
    Posts: 33
    Likes: 5, Points: 8
    Location: Nanaimo, BC.

    James Wellington Junior Member

    Yes, that is one of the four specialist companies I found. They can teat air to sub micon levels. I guess they call them 'air-separation' compenents of the total hvac system. And they adjust according to whatever your needs are. Apparently there is a big difference for the electronics, etc on boatd, not to mention the comfort of the humans.
     
  5. James Wellington
    Joined: Aug 2021
    Posts: 33
    Likes: 5, Points: 8
    Location: Nanaimo, BC.

    James Wellington Junior Member

    Fallguy, exactly, its a big problem. Not only the matter of ventilation, but also that of whatever ventilated air is being pushed around, is still humid and full of salt. Modern hvac sustems as discussed above, and supplied by companies like the one just cited, take care of that.
     
  6. James Wellington
    Joined: Aug 2021
    Posts: 33
    Likes: 5, Points: 8
    Location: Nanaimo, BC.

    James Wellington Junior Member

    More research: "Size of sea salt aerosols ranges widely from ~0.05 to 10 μm in diameter, with most of masses concentrated in super-micron range (coarse mode), and highest number concentration in sub-micron range. Correspondingly, sea salt aerosols have a wide range of atmospheric lifetimes. As the sea salt aerosols are hygroscopic, their particle sizes may vary with humidity by up to a factor of 2. Sea salt aerosols influence the sulfate aerosol formation in different ways due to the different sizes. Very small sea salt aerosols, which are below the critical diameter for droplet activation at low supersaturations, can serve as nuclei for the growth of sulfate particles, while larger sea salt particles serve as a sink for gaseous hydrogen sulfate (H2SO4) molecules, reducing the amount of sulfate available for the formation of accumulation mode particles.[3]"

    No problem, they can get it all.
     
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  7. James Wellington
    Joined: Aug 2021
    Posts: 33
    Likes: 5, Points: 8
    Location: Nanaimo, BC.

    James Wellington Junior Member

    In addition to the corrosivness of salty/humid air on materials, there are also various adverse effects on certain peoples bodies, it makes some people feel slimy, affects hair, a major contributor of the ill-temperament of some of our admirals. Here is a citation for that too: "Salt can create some volume and remove oil, but on the flip side, it can be very harmful,” says Mia Emilio, senior stylist at Devachan Salon. “We have to think about the adverse effects of our styling agents ... You have to decide if achieving volume is worth the price of dry, dull, and matted hair.”
    Turns out whether you’re spritzing a salt spray or taking an actual dip in the ocean, salt works the same way: It pulls oils and natural moisture out. But if too much moisture is lost, the result is parched, brittle locks.
    "In its worst form, salt water damage causes the ends of the hair to split, and breakage can begin,” says Elizabeth Cunnane Phillips, trichologist at Philip Kingsley"
     

  8. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I am sure there would be a huge improvement in air quality and comfort for humans, and it would be very beneficial for anything electronic as well.
    Salt is very corrosive!
     
    James Wellington likes this.
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