Hull to deck joint

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Jakewar, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. Jakewar
    Joined: Jun 2018
    Posts: 1
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    Location: Uk

    Jakewar New Member

    Hello there,

    This is my first post and I’m sure it won’t be my last!

    Beginning this week I have begun the almighty task (well what is for me) of re-coring the deck of my Trident Warrior 40, due to years of water ingress/core rot from a poorly maintained teak deck by the previous owner.
    Ive owned her for the best part of two years and in this time have also come to the conclusions that the hull to deck joint/toe rail area (toe rails are aluminium) on both port and starboard side along most of her length is also leaking. Upon removal of the toe rail I’ve noticed that they are quite badly corroded/pitted and the sealant used to bed them down was dry and deteriorating in places.

    I understand that having the hull deck joint bolted together is what is giving the joint it’s strength.

    Instead of having to buy new toerails (which aren’t exactly the cheapest) and possibility of leaks again in the future. Can I fiberglass the hull/deck joint together eliminating the toerail completely and keep structural integrity of the hull/deck joint without any problems, I’ve attached a photo of the type of hull deck joint. My plan would be to use 6” wide strips to tab the inside and when it comes to laying fiberglass over the new core tabbing the deck to the side of the hull ?
    upload_2018-6-13_21-49-11.jpeg

    Thank you
     
  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    It is all about access and finish.

    You left that out.

    Is it physically possible to reach under for the work bow to stern?

    The finish would look horrible because you'd need external glass as well.

    The join is probably more like 6-6-8 inside and something less out.

    The hull to deck join generally has a cove as well; so you'd perhaps need to put a cove in it.

    Personally, you ought to consider a structural pultrusion before you go this route.

    Call Liberty and see if they can match your toerail in glass.
     
  3. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Roaring Forties

    JosephT Senior Member

  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

  5. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Roaring Forties

    JosephT Senior Member

    Oh I missed that. In that case just remove them and re-seal them with GOOD sealer. Older boats may not have been able to take advantage of the newer 3M products. Attempting to fiberglass the hull will be a big & messy project. 3M 5200 that deck and it will be fine.
     
  6. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I wondered if he could repair the toerail with some thickened epoxy and sand it up and paint it. Cost a lot less, but I wouldn't advise because haven't done it.

    The toerail if thickened epoxy would adhere and repair the pitting would be decent. Probably sand blasting the thing would be first. Cheap vs buying new.
     

  7. kvsgkvng
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    kvsgkvng Senior Member

    Last edited: Jul 6, 2018
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