Huge slow two stroke Piston Engines in LNG commercial ships

Discussion in 'Propulsion' started by rwatson, Sep 16, 2014.

  1. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Fascinating

    "Late last month, engineers lowered the 539-ton engine into place aboard the first of two new Marlin-class containerships being built for Tote, Inc. The engine itself is also significant because it is the first commercial installation of the new ME-GI engine, a dual-fuel, low-speed two stroke, from MAN Diesel and Turbo. The 8L70ME-C8.2GI engine was built under license from Doosan Engine in South Korea and delivered to the shipyard in July....

    “Landing the world’s first low speed, dual fuel engine on the lead Marlin Class ship signifies a shift into a new era of green ship technology”, said Parker Larson, Director of Commercial Programs for General Dynamics NASSCO. “NASSCO is proud to partner with TOTE to construct these cutting edge ships.”


    Fantastic details here

    http://www.dieselduck.info/machine/01 prime movers/diesel_engine/diesel_engine.01.htm
     

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  2. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    It's fascinating but much more fascinating to see how the engine is lowered by crane would know how to get align the propeller shaft with the engine and how to maintain that alignment is achieved when there is still much structure to be welded.
    This is precision work, millimeters, made with pieces weighing several tons. Amazing
     
  3. NavalSArtichoke
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    NavalSArtichoke Senior Member

    The final alignment between engine and propeller shaft is months away at this point. Installing the engine now means that the rest of the ship can be built around it, which is a lot easier than lifting the engine in after the ship has been built. Engine alignments usually take place after the vessel is afloat, so that the hull is deflected into approximately its final operating shape.
     
  4. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    You are quite right, the final alignment must be done at least after the launch. But first an alignment is done, the engine is placed, a prior leveling is done, and trying to finish the boat so that the alignment change as little as possible. Even before launching a previous machining of the horn is made.
    But the interesting thing is not when it's done, which is obvious, but how. I hope to hear your feedback there.
     
  5. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    bit more complicated that your average 4 point adjustment ( then chock fast) as these engines slide on bed plates to allow for them getting longer when they heat up
     

  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

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