How to turn a hull

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by TeddyDiver, Aug 29, 2014.

  1. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,578
    Likes: 120, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Some pics how it turned around on wheels.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. KnottyBuoyz
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 829
    Likes: 55, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 685
    Location: Iroquois, Ontario

    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    Wow!

    I thought my rig was complicated! :p

    [​IMG]
     
  3. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,578
    Likes: 120, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Complicated is my middle name :D The reason for such rig lies behind the fact I have no enthusiasm laying fiberglass overhead. Now I can tilt the boat some to laminate vertical surface instead.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2014
  4. KnottyBuoyz
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 829
    Likes: 55, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 685
    Location: Iroquois, Ontario

    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    You're right. Fiberglassing overhead can be an absolute nightmare.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 476, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This is why you apply a liberal amount of automotive wax to your bald spot, so to make a more effective squeegee.
     
  6. Wynand N
    Joined: Oct 2004
    Posts: 1,259
    Likes: 145, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1806
    Location: South Africa

    Wynand N Retired Steelboatbuilder

    The steel Dix57 I built way back in 1992 had similar system, albeit I used two rings attached to outside of hull to turn boat in position for welding etc.
    Here is link to that boat being welded - bottom picture on page, below Dix65; http://www.5psi.net/index.php?q=node/5
     
  7. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 1,414
    Likes: 57, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 584
    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    I am inspired now. It's getting close to boat rolling time for me and adjustable fixturing would be such an asset. Even the tippy, tippy fixture for fairing my 24' hull has made a world of difference.

    All of those strips on the hull is giving me a headache, though. :D
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 476, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Rolling over isn't difficult unless you make it so. The wheels thing is a bit over the top for most home builds, though yours LP is on the boarder line I'd guess. The weight isn't particularly significant, but it's size suggests a solid approach. I like the backhoe/loader method, which is fast and very controllable, but a dead lift with tackle, maybe with a comealong, chain fall or even tackle would work too. Just lift one rail, until the side of the hull is ready to "flop over center" and prop it up. If you have the room, simply readjust the lifting strap(s) purchase and continue the roll. If you don't have the room, again readjust the straps, but drag it back to it's starting location, so the roll takes place in it's own shadow.
     
  9. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,560
    Likes: 684, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    We've turned boats of over 70 feet with two straps and a crane. You do a double wrap around the hull and make the hull turn in the straps. The only thing to take care of is to hold the hull from swinging too much. It is necessary to use a spreader or frame to keep the straps apart.
     
  10. Poida
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 1,189
    Likes: 51, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 497
    Location: Australia

    Poida Senior Member

    I've never built a boat, I have enough work trying to keep the one I have afloat, but I have thought about it several times.

    Since the boat I build would have to be built in a confined space, how would I turn it? It seems to me that making a frame etc is a waste of time making something that would have no use when you have finished with it, so.

    I figured that I would build the boat upside down as per usual, on a metal flat bed frame. This frame is made so trailer wheels could be attached under it when required and "Vee" members or pads are made to hold the boat in the upright position.

    When you have finished the hull, attach the wheels and tow it off to Gonzo's place, or a company that can turn the boat with a crane, or a heap of guys that can turn it in a large area.

    When the boat is off the trailer attach the "Vee" members and you have an almost finished boat trailer.

    Tow it back home and finish the boat in the upright position.

    Would it work?

    Poida
     
  11. KnottyBuoyz
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 829
    Likes: 55, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 685
    Location: Iroquois, Ontario

    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    Did a walk around my turning rig this morning. Dunno, maybe it helps explain it. pretty much as PAR has described.

    http://youtu.be/39MxpzoXru8
     
  12. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,560
    Likes: 684, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    It depends on the boat. I had a 34' Chappelle sharpie we turned over old tires while pulling with my pickup. If the building has strong roof beams or a gantry, you can use chainfalls and straps to turn it in place.
     
  13. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,578
    Likes: 120, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    And it also depends of the shop or shed you are working in. For me it was too cramped for cranes or trucks. Actually I had to scrape a few inches of the ground to get it turned around. Anyway it took some 50h of work to make the wheels and rollers.
     
  14. timj68
    Joined: Sep 2014
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Southbend, IN

    timj68 New Member

    Thats looks amazing. Great job.
     

  15. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 2,936
    Likes: 140, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1593
    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    that is really a nice rolling rig. looks like a lot of overkill to me, but than you never know if it is strong enough until it is too late.

    I have thought about building a couple of large frames and lift the hull with hand winches, and than flip it and set it back down. this is for the future yacht restoration that I will likely never do.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.