How to approach vacuum infusion on composite chainplates?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Chotu, Aug 26, 2022.

  1. Chotu
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 87
    Likes: 12, Points: 8
    Location: Florida

    Chotu Junior Member

    I have some chainplates I need to put on the boat.

    They are 16 layers of 34oz triax and uni alternated.

    I can’t work with epoxy due to my severe (might die, definitely hospitalization) allergy.

    These need to made of epoxy and I can’t find anyone to do them. So, what if I infuse them?

    I infused nearly the entire boat so I’m familiar with the process, but a huge stack like this seems impossible.

    Is it possible to infuse a stack like this?

    If so, how would you approach it?
     
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 3,012
    Likes: 1,170, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Does your allergy kick in even once the epoxy has fully cured?

    I am wondering if it would be possible for you to 'supervise' somebody else doing the laminating, or would that still be too close for comfort to 'wet' epoxy, even with full PPE?
    I am surprised re how you cannot find anybody to laminate these for you - is their reason for not being interested (despite no doubt a nice financial reward) a concern about potential liability re if anything happens once the chainplates are installed?
    How many chainplates (at 16 layers each) need to be made?
     
  3. Chotu
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 87
    Likes: 12, Points: 8
    Location: Florida

    Chotu Junior Member

    Yeah. I have to leave the marina for that type of open job.

    Nobody really wants to work so it's hard to find anyone. It's a labor shortage in the USA.

    2 need to be laminated
     
  4. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Oh dear, that is not a nice situation to be in.
    Can you handle an epoxy chainplate when it has fully cured, or would that still set off a reaction with you?

    Ideally it would be nice if you could find somebody fairly close by to make these two chainplates for you - but are there any fibreglass companies who might do something like this by mail order perhaps?
     
  5. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    If your allergy is that bad I'd suggest using stainless steel for the chainplates with decent backing plates or knees to spread the loads..
    Jeff
     
  6. Chotu
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 87
    Likes: 12, Points: 8
    Location: Florida

    Chotu Junior Member

    That's not how composite chain plates are made.

    They are made in situ
     
  7. Chotu
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 87
    Likes: 12, Points: 8
    Location: Florida

    Chotu Junior Member

    No good. Already have all the material and someone on my boat who was supposed to be doing this job. He did he cores. Then he stopped working and is just living on my boat and not answering me. Not good.
     
  8. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,424
    Likes: 172, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Sounds unfortunate circumstances- I think the advice you need is legal so you get this cleared up, might even be good to get a Surveyor in to look at the install and act as owners representative to push the works along and give some clarity to all parties around responsibilities..
    Hope it goes well for you.

    Regards from Jeff.
     

  9. rnlock
    Joined: Aug 2016
    Posts: 242
    Likes: 65, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Massachusetts

    rnlock Senior Member

    Offer a little more money, safety and respect than the other employers and you'll have no trouble finding people to work for you. Unless it's some liability issue, which isn't the same as not wanting to work.

    If you were in the Boston area, I might do it just for educational and fun purposes. At least if it was only a day or so. But you'd have to show me just what you wanted me to do and assume no great expertise on my part.

    Could you reduce your exposure by using prepreg? Another resin system? Would vinylester be good enough?

    Could you infuse a few layers at a time? I understand that if the next coat gets put on soon enough, you can get a nice chemical bond. It might mean you have to do a few layers twice a day for a while?

    That guy living on your boat sounds like he might be a much larger problem.
     
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