How Safe Are These?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by CatBuilder, Dec 25, 2011.

  1. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Pretty much all the newer yachts have them. I'm wondering what you guys think about the safety of these "thru hull" windows. I hesitate to call them ports.

    Also, how do they do them? What glass, what sealant?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Who knows. Let the buyer beware. Ive oil caned the sides of tough metal yachts when pushed hard against fenders. I don't like windows in topsides..

    If you need topside widows..... the classic,recessed , opening , portholes work well without maintenance or vulnerability issues. Avoid mounting porthole in the same area that you will fender

    Additionally a recessed pothole makes a very effective boarding step on high topside yachts
     
  3. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    I don't know what they are but I would want an a minimum 3 layers of auto windshield glass with a layer of biax S fabric between each layer epoxied together so all glass particles would be held together in case of a total shattering break. Thick, wide wood stops glued and screwed or bolted.
     
  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    And I was just noticing...the boat pictured has no overhead lighting in the cabin ? Whats going on , are the owners Bats ?
     
  5. eyschulman
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    eyschulman Senior Member

    Sales appeal trumps safe and seaworthy.
     
  6. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I took this photo a few years ago in Grenada

    The window fell out en route from Martinique

    As Michael says, imagine having a steel fishing boat moored outside you in a gale, or bumping a dock post as you make a mistake when backing out of a tight berth (which you for sure will have, given the size of your boat)

    Also imagine being in a public marina and waking up to see a face peering in

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     

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  7. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    another problem with topeside widows is low angle sunlight...morning, afternoon. If you go with topside windows you must have curtains.
     
  8. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I figured as much. I was just curious what everyone thought about them. I wouldn't install them, but it seems every new boat has them.

    Richard: I learned many, many years ago how not to have difficulty in slips. Don't go to them! :D:p

    I do recall a very difficult docking at Rick's marina in Florida with my old Catalac. They had stone pillars (why?:confused:) on the sides of the dock. Rick asked for a certain size slip for the Catalac and the marina obliged. It was blowing 20 (into the slip) and wouldn't you know it? The stone piling was smaller than the beam of my boat! :mad:

    Got a few scratches that day I had to repair.

    Other than that, I don't do docks... only fuel docks. Touch and go - back to anchor. ;)
     
  9. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Docks are pretty easy to deal with...a yacht dragging anchor into you during a thunderstorm is more problematic and damaging to topsides.
     
  10. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    You anchor near other people?!? ha ha ha ;)

    I've lived at anchor year 'round for the past 6 years non-stop, until I came back on land to build the new boat. I'm much more comfortable at anchor. I don't like the way docks pound on your boat in storms, or the gaggles of people. I trust my anchor.
     
  11. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    That's it in one.

    I remember being told of interior designers who knew nothing of boats drawing up interiors and then coming to the yacht designers office and being told to wrap a boat around it.
    This was in the 100ft plus multimillion dollar class where I did my time .

    I see similar out there now, boats designed to be the centre of attraction at the marina and boatshow, but totally impractical for actual use on much more than a 15knot day.

    These could possibly be an example

    [​IMG]
     
  12. rberrey
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    rberrey Senior Member

    I,m a bit confused, are we looking at the fixed windows, portlights, or glass hatches. I,m ordering mine tues so I would like to hear the pros and cons. My design calls for some large fixed glass, I have opted for 6 opening 8"x20", 2 - 6" round portlights and 3 glass hatches topside . I do plan on storm covers for all. Rick
     
  13. Deppari Yachts
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    Deppari Yachts Junior Member

    I have them on my boat. They seem pretty strong, especially because we bounce around at 60mph. When I was looking at the construction of the boat they were holding them in the hull with suction cups to let whatever was holding it dry.
     
  14. eyschulman
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    eyschulman Senior Member

    All I know is when in the late 60s I did a tour of duty on a coat guard cutter in the north sea and we had to do a hurricane rescue on a 45ft motor sailer the windows where caved in. They were a lot smaller and looked much less exposed than what I am seeing on some of the new cats and monohulls. I think there is a big difference between seaworthy for dockside and protected waters and open ocean use. I think that issue is being glossed over by sales pitch and many boat designers. The fact that many such boats make passages only proves that they have not met the critical wave yet.
     

  15. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    i disagree, if these windows are poly carbonate they could possibly be stronger than the hull they are on. i have seen large logs smash into poly windscreens on tree harvesters and they just bounce off.
     
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