how long should my keel be

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by matheo, May 4, 2021 at 12:35 PM.

  1. matheo
    Joined: Tuesday
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: australia

    matheo New Member

    I am interested in boat building and I realize a keel is an important part if not the most important part and I'm wondering how large my keel should be on a 6 m long old wood boat. I was thinking of making the keel 12 x 8 and frames 6 x 6 but then I realized it's too large for a 6 m long boat so now I'm wondering if a 8 x 6 with frames of 4 x 4 and also could you please give me some recommendations for nice and cheap good types of wood for boat building and can you please tell me the engine I require to run a beast of this size? By the way (width)x(length) all measurement are in inches(2.5 cm) and I'm planing on making a floor under the deck and a raised floor at the back of the ship for the steering wheel and I'm wondering if I have to add weight above the keel like cement or lead and what type of brass or bronze works best in this case.
    Thank you for you attention from a wanna be boat builder, me
     
  2. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,941
    Likes: 472, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

    Welcome to the forum.
    Ok, way too many questions to adequately answer with the information provided. When you say "old wood boat", there are at least half a dozen different construction methods each with their own scantling and frame-and-space rules. If you are really interested in making a classic (i.e. early 20th century) wooden boat in the Aus/UK/US downeast style, get a copy of Yacht Designing and Planning by Chapelle and/or Elements of Yacht Design by Skene. Both are period, have scantling rules, and are available in print for about $20US each. A good investment. Or pay Will's shipping... Old Books for Cheap https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/old-books-for-cheap.65445/
     
    bajansailor likes this.
  3. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 1,789
    Likes: 572, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Following on from J E Hardiman's excellent advice above -
    Are you looking to restore an existing old 6 metre long wooden boat, or build a new one?
    If the former, do you have any photos that you can post of it?
    If the latter, what type of boat is it? Do you have a set of plans for it? If so, can you post any details?

    Re type of wood, it all depends on what shape your hull form is, and what type of construction you want to use - plank on frame, lapstrake, strip plank, plywood.......
    Please give us some more details.
    Re engine size required, this will depend on what type of hull form you have, what speed you want to achieve, and how heavy the boat is (or will be).

    I am looking forward to finding out more about your boat - she sounds interesting.
     
    Rumars likes this.
  4. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 9,624
    Likes: 832, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    6m is still a fairly small boat, and there is no need to have timbers that would be more in place in an old road bridge. I assume you are not a speed freak, as a heavy boat is a slow boat !
     
    bajansailor and jehardiman like this.
  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 9,624
    Likes: 832, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I don't think a 6m carvel hull would be easy to find, I can't recall seeing one.
     
  6. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,941
    Likes: 472, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

    Yeah, for a caravel boat that size with sawn frames, Chapelle gives a planking thickness of 1/2" and frames sided 3/4" x moulded 1" with a space of 7" (edited due to brain fart...6m, not 30 feet).
    Matheo...perhaps you should start at this .au site, I'm sure they can help you.
    The Wooden Boat Association https://www.woodenboat.asn.au/
    and
    Boat Plans and Building Tips https://www.woodenboat.asn.au/links/boat-plans.html
     
  7. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,941
    Likes: 472, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

    Today, everyone is using glued strip or lapstrake for weight and ease, but back in the early 1900's many small boats were carvel ... peapods for a prime example.
     

  8. Old Stoker
    Joined: Feb 2020
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Australia

    Old Stoker Junior Member

    Try to find a book called Simplified Boatbuilding by Harry V Sucher.
    Or George Buehler's Backyard Boatbuilding.
    Good Luck. One of these should help.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.