How big is a boat?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by JonathanCole, Jan 31, 2006.

  1. JonathanCole
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    JonathanCole imagineer

    Well in the case of the large RingShip previously described, it is not exactly static since it is neither anchored or moored. It does station keep. It has pumps powered by wave power and around the perimeter has pumped water outlets that can be opened selectively to precisely determine the direction of motion needed to offset wind and current. This is a lot less power than is required to move a cruiseship at 30 knots. The ship also has a sea anchor in the form of an artificial reef suspended from a circular net which is attached to the inside of the main ring. This resists drift, at least wind drift.

    Attached to outside of the main ring is a secondary ring which is laced to the main ring with ropes in a similar fashion to the way a bicycle rim is laced to its hub with spokes, except in the case of the ring ship, the outer "rim" is proportionally a small distance of only about 10 meters from the main ring. Since it is laced with flexible rope, it is free to move to a restricted degree in relationship to the main ring. On top of this outer ring (which floats) is a deck that surrounds the main ring except where the opening to the inner lake is situated. So boats can tie up to this deck in good weather. The outside of this deck ring is shaped so as to focus the waves that hit it in such a way that they put pressure on the ring but turn the wave back on itself. This moves the deck ring but prevents waves from crashing on the deck.

    Between the outer ring and the main ring there are hydraulic rams situated perpendicular to tangent of the main ring. These pump water when pushed in, through a one way check valve. This water goes into a chamber on the lowest deck of the ring. The chamber is quite large since it completely encircles the main ring below decks. In this chamber are large air filled bladders. When the waves pump the water in, it compresses the bladder, pressurizing the tank (air is far more compressible than water). When a propulsion port is opened, the pressurized water pushes out, creating thrust.

    If there is insufficient wave power, there is also solar power which can be used to pump water into the same chamber or if that is insufficient there is a fuel powered pump that can pump the water in. Compressed air is therefore used to store any kind of energy avaiilable which is then released as needed.

    Of course, in good weather a supply ship/boat can tie up, but, as was previously mentioned, what about rough weather that lasts for a month?
     
  2. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Same as happens in the rougher areas of the world - Northern North Sea! In the oil business! The 'boat' station keeps on the 'deck side' of the rig using thrusters, engines skill and lots of coffee! (it can become hard work eventually, with the older vessels especially! The concentration is quite terrific) then all the stores are either transfered by crane (the term is snatching - sez it all) or hoses for liquids. Hard work - yes, expensive - yes, risky (to men and materials) - yes: but it keeps the job running and that's what it is all about ain't it? Sheeeze am I glad I don't do it anymore! I've just scared the pants off myself!:rolleyes:

    Home production if possible is both easier and cheaper!
     
  3. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    How about some ideas for ship to ship transfers on open water.

    Go to your nearest oil port and get a pass, to visit a rig.

    The oil rigs are supplied 24/7 by supply boats , usually 150 ft to 225ft .

    The boats run in heavy weather.

    FAST FRED
     
  4. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Well blow me I'm sure that's what I just said Fred! Only in Europe it ain't that easy to get onto a rig! :cool:

    As for ship to ship in deep water RN (includes Commonwealth N {RAN,RNZN etc}) & USN do it regularly at 15 knots plus - fast enough for you?:p
     
  5. boltonprofiles
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    boltonprofiles Senior Member

    Jonathan, this whole idea is very interesting to me, I would love to have been involved in such a project if only time would allow, you would probably have to do it in Saudi or somewhere that has mega bucks............please keep us informed.
    Walrus - my worst recollection was climbing up from the semi-submersible every day in the Ninians Field when I worked with Pisces Offshore for three years at around minus 20 C and wondering if I would make it to the top of the ladder as my fingers wouldnt hold on any more (and I was fit in those days) - sheesh - I take my hat off to you boys.
     
  6. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Paul getting washed up the deck with a couple of caintainers as companions is the way to go!:cool:

    Old style rig shifts were even better! 56mm bouy wire and putting the pelican hook on by hand! with the bouy between the house and you - **** the invention of 'Karm forks' is the greatest thing known to man!:cool:

    Conversation in the mess room some years ago
    deckhand - " there's been seven guys killed in supply boats over the last three months!":eek:
    me -" Oh that's pretty heavy!"
    deckhand - " Yeah and six of those were the mate - and your the mate!"
    me - [again] Oh! that's pretty heav -you fu**ing WHAT!":rolleyes:

    took me a further 9 years before I quit tho' slo-o-o-o-w learner or what!

    "I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it!"
     
  7. xarax

    xarax Previous Member

    A polygonal-shaped (and not torus-shaped) ringboat?

    Every side of it can be an autonomous boat that can move in and out of the ring in case of an emergency situation.
     
  8. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Which is neat in calm waters, but emergencies tend to be during rough unfriendly conditions with everything jumping about all over the place, ever tried unmooring with a scend of several metres? tends to remove fingers and toes (and other parts) if you ain't fast enough or get it wrong! Plus EVEN if you don't want to get away walking tends to be interesting on the edge unless your bloody big vessel wise!
     
  9. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

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  10. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    IMO defines what a ship is and other marine structures. I would guess that ships not in their definition would be called a boat or watercraft.
     
  11. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    rx, so what some chair bound numpty sez matters eh, read the forum man! 'could be called a 'buss' for all the good it would do! Old definitions stand the test of time, bet your one of these new found idiots who thinks 'gay' means a sexual deviant, well it don't suggest you look up the original meaning - same with a boat (in the process you could look up buss too, might be surprised!)
     
  12. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    What is the problem safewalrus? I posted this question before in this forum and somebody led me to the right answers. somebody even gave me a book about IMO.
     
  13. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    could be you appear to have the definition of a boat slightly wrong!
     
  14. JonathanCole
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    JonathanCole imagineer

    Hey Safewalrus, I'd like to remind you of the request I made when starting this thread. "Let's keep it cordial and base our observations and ideas as much as we can on factual information and not opinion or ego-tripping."

    I know RX and he's no idiot, as a matter of fact he is a brilliant boatbuilder and a very knowledgable guy about marine technology. If you disagree with someone there's no necessity of making insulting remarks.

    Now a lot of old seafarers might think that that's too wimpy. Maybe so, the problem with a digital foprum is we can't crack beer bottles over the head of the bloke what just insulted us. So let's just keep it friendly, otherwise we build up too much unrelieved stress:D
     

  15. Wellydeckhand

    Wellydeckhand Previous Member

    Mr Guillermo,

    Do u think a barge like construction to a certain size is a boat or a big Nirvana extended kind of boat?...... Is a aircraft carrier a Nirwana?

    Thanks

    Wellydeckhand:)
     
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