House boat cat hull plans

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by adriano, Jul 27, 2018.

  1. adriano
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: italy

    adriano Junior Member

    Hi there
    am looking for houseboat cat hull bilding plans of approx. 18/20 mt. length
    This attached one could be suitable
    Do you know who is the designer?
    If anybody has any infos kindly let me know
    Thanks
    Adriano
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,613
    Likes: 162, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What makes you like that rendering ? It isn't a particularly good depiction.
     
  3. adriano
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: italy

    adriano Junior Member

    optimal displacement, not because of hydrodynamics , the flaoting house most of time will be moored.
    Anything better to suggest?
    Thanks
    Adriano
     
  4. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,138
    Likes: 133, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    a catamaran is not a good platform for a house boat when compared to a barge shape. Not as good load carrying but more important, the CoG of the 'house" needs to be calculated carefully or the catamaran will trim either bow up/down or have an angle of loll. CofG is likely to be higher as well, less space for tankage down low etc

    Better to show an example of a houseboat you like rather than a below WL view

    Richard Woods
     
  5. adriano
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: italy

    adriano Junior Member

    Thanks Richard
    Yes you may be right. Actually it should become a party boat rather than a house boat!
    It could be something like the attached picture with open top deck
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,613
    Likes: 162, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The original rendering does look a bit barge-like. I'll call it a bargamaran.
     
  7. adriano
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: italy

    adriano Junior Member

    Whatever name is fine with me.
    As mentioned, it doesnt need to perform on speed, indeed that design shows some good storage space under deck.
     
    Mr Efficiency likes this.
  8. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,613
    Likes: 162, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If speed is not an ambition, ditch the cat idea, and go with Richard's barge. In any case, 18-20 metres still gives a fair speed potential in a barge.
     
  9. adriano
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: italy

    adriano Junior Member

    you mean simply (or close to) as quared off floating box?
    I know cat woud be more expensive to build but with reasonable starage under deck have some advantage when moving on the water,
    am also thinking transverse stability when approx 30 or more people lean all together on one side?!
    By the way it will be build in composite construction.
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,613
    Likes: 162, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    No, the bow needs some shape, sufficient rake, or you will have a very wet conveyance, and you also want the bottom to rise up to the waterline aft, to avoid excessive drag. A catamaran does not have greater ultimate stability, to a barge of the same rectangular plan. I don't think 30 people on a typical 60 foot barge would have much impact at all.
     
  11. adriano
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: italy

    adriano Junior Member

    well.. i missed to mention that the beam might habe to be 8/9 mt. this would change the picture relating to cost/stability etc.
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,613
    Likes: 162, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    8-9 m is plenty for that length. And the barge will draw less water than the cat, if that is ever needed.
     
  13. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,138
    Likes: 133, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I am British so when you said "houseboat" I thought you meant what N Americans call a "float home" ie something static, which is how we would define it. But you mean something that can move on calm lakes and slow flowing rivers? And yet you are from Italy? so where do you plan to use/moor your boat???

    RW
     
  14. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 988
    Likes: 33, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Pay close attention to RW and the rest of good advise re stern drag, etc. We see a few on here now and then trying to make modifications houseboats on cat hulls with insufficient displacement. The typical advise is to barge them.

    You are starting out ahead if you heed wisdom.
     

  15. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 988
    Likes: 33, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    It looks to me like the cat hull portion will always be fully submerged. I can't see how they offer much besides increasing draft.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.