High Speed Aluminium Boat for 20 Pax

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by RakeshTendulkar, Sep 29, 2018.

  1. RakeshTendulkar
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    RakeshTendulkar Junior Member

    Hi All,
    I am doing my Boat Design Course and side by side I am practicing small boat designing in India.
    One customer asked me to design High Speed Aluminium Boat for 20 Pax with following basic details.
    1) Length - Max. 13 Mtr
    2) Passenger - 20 pax Max
    3) Speed - Max. 70 Knots
    4) Engine - Stern Drive
    5) Material of Cosntruction - Aluminium

    Is it possible to design a boat with given criteria. I doubt for such a high speed.
    your suggestions and guidance are welcomed.
    thanks
    Rakesh
    rakeshtendulkar.adc@gmail.com
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    70 knots, they better be strapped in.
     
    fallguy likes this.
  3. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    You could design a structure that supports that speed but I doubt very much that the passengers will hold it. Now, as an academic exercise, you can not object, it takes the designer to the limits of his abilities.
     
  4. RakeshTendulkar
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    RakeshTendulkar Junior Member

    Sir,
    But which scantling method i can use to design structure? We have been thought of Dave Gerr's Method of Scantling.
    Also whether boat will support stability at this speed?
    rg
    rakesh
     
  5. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Forget Dave Gerrs and similar books, they are obsoletes and no regulator of that type of vessel would accept them. What you have to use are the Regulations of some Classification Society. Check, for example, if the Lloyd's Register Special Service Crafts rules apply to your boat.
    In terms of stability, there are applicable standards for high-speed vessels that will tell you the criteria applicable to these vessels.
    In any case, they are your teachers who should guide you in all these aspects.
     
  6. Cacciatore
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    Cacciatore Junior Member

    Hi , you can design this boat in accordance with the Classification of High Speed Craft (HSC) of Bureau Veritas .
    I suggest also to analyse the seakeeping of the boat in rough condition checking the acceleration onboard in several locations. This suggests you to choose the right shock-absorbing seats for example SHOXS | Shock Mitigation Technology https://shoxs.com/ for military purpose.All the best!
     
  7. RakeshTendulkar
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    RakeshTendulkar Junior Member

    Thanks a lot for your valuable suggestion
    regards
    rakesh
     
  8. RakeshTendulkar
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    RakeshTendulkar Junior Member

    thanks for your this good suggestion. I will check
    regards,
    rakesh
     
  9. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Max 13 metres, isn't quite Incat's thing ! I'm not sure too many authorities would licence a sub 13 metre boat to carry paying passengers at 70 knots, that is literally, break-neck speed for a boat. Racing offshore tunnel-hulls that can go that fast, typically have safety capsules for the crew, and crew that typically have less respect for their spine than your typical tourist.
     
  11. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Incat built 6 30 foot ferries in the days of the broken bridge in Hobart.

    I didn't say they would build it, I was hinting at they could help design it.
     
  12. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    The OP hasn't said where the boat will be operated. Sheltered water is more feasible for higher speeds although the risk of collision with another vessel could be high.
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Come a long way since then, hey. Who is that down to, one man ?
     

  14. RakeshTendulkar
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    RakeshTendulkar Junior Member

    Hello Sir,
    I myself was doubting to make such high speed boat which will be not suitable to carry Passenger for pure tourism purpose. But after reading some above post from Senior Memebrs, I am sure it is not a good idea as it will increase risk of passenger lifes.
    thanks to all for their valuable advice.
    regards,
    rakesh
     
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