Hi from Devon

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Millssy, Nov 29, 2016.

  1. Millssy
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    Millssy New Member

    Hi All,
    I just thought i would say a quick hello as ive just bought my first hull and am about to start fitting her out.

    So i didnt want to bombard you with questions before properly introducing myself!

    Im Pete and heres my tub...

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Wow, what make is it ? That is taking the high bow to the limit.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I thought this one ( Cape Cat from Tasmania) was rather high-bowed.......
     

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  4. Millssy
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    Millssy New Member

    Shes built by a company called Twinseas in Poole, Dorset.
    http://www.twinseasboats.co.uk/

    I thought they were quite high bowed so wouldnt handle well in any wind, took one to see how they handle and was really suprised.
    Shes loverly and stable, had abit of drift in the wind but nothing i wouldnt expect from a shallow draft boat.

    First time ive ever fit out a boat so am abit nervous about drilling my first hole!
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Lots of pics of these boats here, for anyone interested :
    http://www.findafishingboat.com/twinseas-6-3-6-9-7-5-cat/ad-65599/4

    I notice some models appear to have stepped bottoms, are those steps ventilated ?
    The high bows would perhaps be a draw-back heading up-wind, both in terms of being an air dam, and creating bow lift, you'd imagine, some of the very best cats I've experienced were not high tunnelled forward. But these are obviously work boats, not built for speed. and maybe weighty enough not to be adversely affected. The other side of the coin is that taking solid water over the bow would appear most unlikely.
     
  6. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Small power catamarans appear to be popular in UK harbours which dry out at low tide. The cats sit upright on the bottom when the water vanishes.

    The forward house probably contributes as much or more than the high bow to any tendency for the boat to turn away from the wind.
     
  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    -
    Twinseas Boats ---> About

    ---> Our Builds

     
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Welcome to the forum Pete [​IMG], I'm sure your bombardment with questions will be answered here . . :)
     
  10. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Please post about the fitting out, I'd love to follow the process, and you're also able to post questions along the way . . :)

    I'm just here to watch and learn, but don't worry there are experts too here, I'm sure they will give guidance to the process whenever you ask for it . . :cool:
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The demi-hulls are quite broad, and presumably they are not super-heavy boats to be able to run with the small engines. Surprising ! I do wonder about bow lift in a stiff head-wind.
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Cats have certainly encountered greater acceptance world-wide, and that they dry out level isn't the main reason, imo. People like the resistance to heel under weight shifts, the space offered by rectangular hull plan, good ride quality, and potential greater seaworthiness, in terms of resistance to broach, particularly. There are drawbacks though, two engines are generally required, and the initial cost is greater because there is more material and structural complexity. You can make a monohull from 4 side and bottom panels plus the transom, a hard chine cat with symmetrical hulls has at least 9 panels plus the transom(s).
     
  13. Millssy
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    Millssy New Member

    Thanks for all the welcome messages!

    I will run up a post once i start drilling holes etc so theres a running comentry of what im doing.

    The main reason for getting the twinsea was that i get the flexibility of a rib as she will fit on a trailer so i can tow her to jobs and we get the comfort of a hardboat.

    I got a few custom mods done during the build like the extended wheelhouse roof so i can put canvas sides on during the winter and have more dry space etc.

    Ill be putting on twin 50hp Yamahas which the builder thinks should do 30knots flat out, ill be happy with 20!
     
  14. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    What is your plan for fittings, etc?
    If we had a list it might generate more suggestions.

    What do you intend to do with the boat?

    Fishing, tug work, salvage?
     

  15. Millssy
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    Millssy New Member

    She will be used mainly for diving.

    I plan on commercially hand diving scallops and I have commercial scientific/media work lined up.

    I'll start a new thread with gory details and pictures.
     
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