Help with navigation light wiring

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by Racer, Jun 20, 2007.

  1. Racer
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Mooresville, NC

    Racer New Member

    I have a question on navigation lights.

    My lights are hooked up to a 3 way switch. Center is hot, one side is the front red/green light and the other side is the rear white anchor light.

    I thought that when the nav lights are on, the rear light should light as well but the way my boat is wired I can only have 1 or the other.

    Is the correct? If not, what is needed to wire it correctly? Just a new switch?

    Thanks for any help provided.

    Jeff
     
  2. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    The possible combinations should be, on small powered craft:
    All off
    Red/green AND white on (running configuration)
    White only on (anchoring configuration)
    The usual easy way of doing this is with two single-pole single-throw switches, one for R/G and one for W. Some boats have it rigged so one switch turns on both R/G and W simultaneously, and a second switch turns on white only.
     
  3. barnaclephill
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: melbourne, australia

    barnaclephill New Member

    Quote: and the other side is the rear white anchor light.
    --------------

    the anchor light should be all-round white. If it's sectored (135 deg) then it's only for sailing.



    Quote: Some boats have it rigged so one switch turns on both R/G and W simultaneously, and a second switch turns on white only.
    -----------

    Firstly I switch on the nav lights( R, W & Grn); then have a 2-way switch which is to switch between the white masthead or stern white, and then a 3rd 2-way switch to turn off the R & Grn, so that the white masthead is my all-round anchor light.
    That covers moving under sail or motor, and anchored. I've seen a better method in a magazine but it called for more switches.
     
  4. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    QUOTE------------

    the anchor light should be all-round white. If it's sectored (135 deg) then it's only for sailing.Quote:

    You mean steaming?

    Red /green /white to rear is normal navigation lighting, these can and should be on the same switch as one with out the other would not comply

    When motoring (steaming) you are now a power boat so you need a light on the mast to comlpy with power boat regs.

    To anchor you need an all round white.


    The confusion can sometime be with all round. This means exactly that and if you think about it theres only one place that can be all round,- and that is at the top of the boat. With a yacht that is unfortunaley at the top of the mast un shrouded by any thing 360 degrees.

    A lantern hanging in the rigging for instance will not satisfy.
     

  5. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    For small craft up here in Canada (and I believe it's exactly the same in the USA):
    Powerboats display a red light from 0 to 112.5 degrees port, a green light from 0 to 112.5 degrees starboard, and a white all-round light. (The all-round light may be replaced by two lights, one up high from 112.5 deg port to 112.5 deg starboard and a separate light at the stern to fill the remainder of the 360 degrees.)
    Sailboats display a red light from 0 to 112.5 degrees port, a green light from 0 to 112.5 degrees starboard, and a white light facing astern to fill the remaining portion of the 360 degrees that is not covered by red or green.
    When under engine, a sailboat will display powerboat lights.
    At anchor, all boats will display their all-round white light only.
    As boats get larger there are additional lights required.
    Frosty is right that an all-round light really does mean all-round. If it's on a pole that's obstructed by the canvas top (typical of small runabouts) it's gotta be moved higher up. If it's on a sailboat it's gotta be at the top of the mast, not on the side/front of the mast where it's obstructed.
    Transport Canada publishes a very clear, concise guide to all the safety equipment required up here, including what the lights look like, at http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/TP/TP511/boat.htm#Min_equipment
    The regs in the US aren't as strict with regards to equipment but the lights are the same (and since the sum total of TC-recommended safety gear is maybe $40 for everything but the lifejackets on an average small boat, it's hard to justify not having it.)
     
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