Help with first skiff build

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by curttampa, Mar 18, 2020.

  1. curttampa
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    curttampa Junior Member

    I’m tired of fishing from my kayak and have always wanted to build a stitch and glue boat. I found this skiff on youtube and it fits the bill exactly. Looks fast enough with a 5hp and stable enough to stand up and cast. I contacted the owner of the video but no reply - Chinese I think. Any recommendations on how to scale this out or develop a plan?

     
  2. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    Scoots right along, doesn't it?

    There are tons of free s&g boat plans out there, but the ones similar to this are for more pedestrian jonboats. I haven't seen one quite like this. It's pretty simple, though.

    I found this (not free); it's open instead of decked, but looks like it would perform similarly:

    Twang Plans https://www.duckworks.com/product-p/jm-twang.htm
     
  3. curttampa
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    curttampa Junior Member

    Thanks! Agree tons of plans out there but I really want a copy of that exact boat. My fishing water is backwater rivers, marshes and bay flats. Fast to plane without stern dig, shallow draft and simplicity makes this a good choice. Looks cheap to build.
     
  4. HJS
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    HJS Member

  5. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  6. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    OP didn't mention it, but it seems the key feature of the Chinese skiff is the deeply inset motor mount and extended rear side sections. That allows the rider's weight to remain much more centered, and allows him to hold the motor handle without discomfort or imbalance. Its a skiff with the COG of a kayak! I don't see anything like it in any existing standard plans. No idea what the overall efficiency is compared to normal light planning skiff, but I'd bet its very ergo-metric for actual intended use.

    I'd mod the design with following:

    a)make the raised seat a removable (strapped down) ice chest of this model. I was going to use one as the raised sliding seat a rowing shell, but I still use for seating at construction sites and its quite comfy and I'm about 285lbs.https://www.amazon.com/Igloo-Cooler...words=ice chest 13 can&qid=1584559231&sr=8-21
    b)make semi-self draining (removable plug) wells in the two rear extensions for two more ice-chests(or battery for motor, or tackle boxes).
    c)add lightweight (not that strong) motor-mounts on one or two of the rear extensions for small electric trolling motor.

    SeaEagle makes a highly rated inflatable of similar overall arrangement to OP's skiff, but you couldn't add extra motor-mounts for small trolling motor. Sea Eagle FSK16 3 person Inflatable Fishing Boat. Package Prices starting at $1,999 plus FREE Shipping https://www.seaeagle.com/InflatableFishingSkiffs/FSK16

    "Any recommendations on how to scale this out or develop a plan?"
    I'd just take your favorite stock conventional small skiff S&G plans and add-in the deck and rear-inset motor mount. Then post drawings here and you will get good tips on the finer points.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2020
    bajansailor likes this.
  7. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    I noticed that the only internal framing consists of transverse bulkheads, and wondered if it wouldn't benefit from a longitudinal stiffener of some sort, but it seems very solid at speed. I suppose the deck and hull bottom act like the flanges of a beam and the sides take the place of the web.
     
  8. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    but would a pointy bow boat perform same when standing up casting? the OP's skiff has flotation volume moved out to far four corners, front back and side to side. and its deck means its got massive flotation much like a SOT kayak, in case things go wrong, and its deck also gives strength not found in conventional open skiffs. The more I think about it, the more I see why OP is enamored with the design as upgrade/replacement to kayak. Its a combo of jonboat, SOT-kayak and cat, and seems to work very well.
     
  9. curttampa
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    curttampa Junior Member

    Yes! Those are my thoughts exactly. It’s a very niche design he has developed but one I keep coming back to. The blunt now seems more stable logically - I have no education in maters of stability but did stand in a 13’ gheenoe - which to it’s credit was rather stable aft but up forward it felt like a standard canoe. Sight casting from a standing position is what I’m after. The builder indicated he used it for bow fishing. I assume the design is a flat bottom. Is this best for stability? I understand the trade off in pounding and getting wet.
     
  10. curttampa
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    curttampa Junior Member

    I’ve taken still frames from his video and will try to scale a drawing. I can’t tell if the sides have any shear to them or if they are straight (level). The bottom of the side panel obviously curves upward how critical is that dimension? From what point measuring from the rear forward should the upturn start? Without a 2D side view I will be guessing. The dimensions as seen on his YouTube reply is as follows: length 3.6m beam 1.2m and bottom width 9.0m
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2020
  11. curttampa
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    Location: Tampa

    curttampa Junior Member

  12. curttampa
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    Location: Tampa

    curttampa Junior Member

    I agree looks nice. Still more volume than I’m looking for. Some of my fishing is wade fishing from sandbars so ease of getting on and off the boat is important.
     
  13. curttampa
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    curttampa Junior Member

    Interesting observation. I’m new to the structures of internal bracing and grids but it did strike me as minimal. I expected to see a backbone of sorts running fore and aft. Seems like the stern motor mount would benefit from such a stiffner(?)
     

  14. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    does anyone ever rig unused emergency oars/paddles as stabilizers for standup casting? Rowing shells are very narrow with round hulls, and the seat is raised, but the first thing they teach you how you can hold both oar handles with one hand (to keep other free to do whatever) you are very stable and no worries about big boat wakes, etc.
     
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