Help with first project

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Darkranger85, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Vermont USA

    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    Hello all,

    I hope this is the right place for this post, if not I apologize.

    First of all let me introduce myself. I am 25 and I live in Vermont. Over the last couple weeks I have gotten very interested in building a boat.

    So me and my father are going to build a very simple kayak to get our "feet wet" so to speak.

    Now, I found a design that is simple and cheap. But I was hoping someone here would be able to give me additional information.

    Link: http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/oss3/oss3.htm

    Most of the instructions are fairly easy to understand but toward the end he says that he treated it with linseed oil and dosn't explain how or why to do it.

    Then he says that he applied a dark brown water repellent. Again, I have no idea how he did it. Do you need multiple coats? is there a specific way to do it? etc etc.

    Is there a finish I can put on it that will make it more waterproof as well as giving it a nice glossy shine and feel?

    Is there are way to increase it's Weight Displacement? (The plans say it has 230lbs currently.)

    Also, on top of his instructions, does anyone here have additional advice?

    Thank you all ahead of time for any help you can offer! :)
     
  2. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Vermont USA

    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    Also, he doesnt mention if the cuts are beveled at all.
     
  3. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Welcome aboard the forum :)

    Sounds like a good way to start....
    Bare plywood will deteriorate over time- water plus sunlight and it'll start to check and turn grey. Linseed oil (just brushed on, let the wood absorb what it will) is one way to keep it looking OK for a couple of years. A much more durable solution is a thin layer of fibreglass cloth and epoxy.
    Increasing displacement means a bigger boat. That particular project appears to be mainly a "Can we do this with one sheet of plywood" thing- neat and clever, but not a load carrier and not for rough conditions. By all means, go for it if you want- but do use some common sense, and don't load it up with 300 lb of crew and gear. If you need a bigger boat, find plans for a bigger boat and be prepared to pay more for materials.
    The cuts probably aren't bevelled. It looks like the seams are just glued and filled. If you want the boat to last, taped seams (fibreglass/epoxy) would be better.
     
  4. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    It looks like a hair's breadth from swamping the thing in the "heeled" photo. Better be ready for a wet butt. Not really something I would take off in.

    Still, an interesting boat.
     
  5. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Vermont USA

    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    Do you guys have anysuggestions if you think this one isn't quite what it should be?

    My main things are:

    cost - has to be relativly cheap to build.

    Simple- this is a two fold point. One being that we have no experience so simple is good and the other being that I don't want it to be something that takes months to make, I am hoping to be able to get out on the lake this year. . Preferably not the end of the year.

    Thank you guys for your input so far!
     
  6. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    The dugout thing is a clever use of a single piece of ply. That is well and good but it does not make much of a boat. In fact it a a weird looking contraption that is very apt to send you swimming. The long overhangs on the ends are absurd. The plans are cheap enough but the result will not be worth the time and money you have spent.

    If you want a low cost, simple to build, quick to build, entirely adequate, double paddle boat, I urge you to take a look at the "Six Hour Canoe" There is a paperbound book that you can buy (same name: Six Hour Canoe). The book will give you every building and finishing instruction you need. A lot of these boats have been built, and used successfully.The name is misleading in that a person who has never built a boat will probably need twelve hours to build this one. You can build the boat in a few days by working on it a couple of hours at a time. The real time consuming part comes after the boat is built. Now you have to finish it. That means that you will need to spend some time sanding and painting. There goes another ten to fifteen hours depending on how pretty you want it to be. Try googling; Six Hour Canoe. Please do yourself a favor and forget the dugout type weirdo travesty that you referred to.
     
  7. dreamer
    Joined: Nov 2004
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    Location: Minnesota, USA

    dreamer Soñadora

    I can tell you something about this. Not the boat, but about the fact that it's from a Finn.

    I married a Finn.

    This is a drinking boat.

    i.e., you build it, put it in the yard, grab some vodka, sit in it and drink.

    Don't let those pictures of it actually floating fool you.
     
  8. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Vermont USA

    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    Again, thank you guys for the information.

    I have purchased the Six Hour Canoe book and can't wait to read it.

    In the mean time I have been looking at other things as well and was wondering if you guys would have some input on the "seaworthyness" of this kayak plan.

    They are from www.Jemwatercraft.com and are free plans.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Much better than your first submission.
     
  10. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Vermont USA

    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    I'm glad to hear that. :)

    How about how difficult would it be to build for a novice?
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    That depends on how smart you are. If you are generally skillful at problem solving it should be fairly easy for you. Take your time. Measure twice before each cut. Make sure you only cut what you intend to cut. Don't use any product without gaining knowledge first. Keep a first aid kit handy.

    Common sense. Then you won't need the first aid kit.
     
  12. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    The only problem with them is I don't see a bill of materials anywhere in the plan.
     
  13. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Keep looking. I am sure it is in there somewhere.
     

  14. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: The Land of Lost Content

    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Keep all receipts for materials if you want to get a title for it.
     
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