Help with displacement cruiser for retirement

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by CPperch, Nov 28, 2011.

  1. CPperch
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Yakima WA

    CPperch Junior Member

    I'm currently building a 26 foot Tracy O Brien design, and am already thinking about the next big project (and several smaller).

    I'm interested in a seaworthy displacement cruiser, wooden, capable of being home built over a few years. I really like the salty looks of Beuhler's Diesel Ducks and the construction looks "simple", but very heavy, and maybe not as efficient as claimed (and spendy), but love the looks and space. Need room for two, maybe 3 (me, wife & daughter) in comfort, but definitely not luxo-yacht finish. 38'-45' length, diesel, speed up to maybe 12-15 knots, cruise 6-10 knots (efficient, but enough power to be safe). Capable of travel up and down west coast, NW passage, where ever my nose points(retirement is in sight!!). Live aboard for lengthy stretches (the summer home on the water). Room for a skiff, fore and aft cabin, real pilot house and engine room, small cockpit. Did I mention seaworthy? And build-able incrementally (cost wise) is small bites (except for things like engine of course) in my 30x80 shop.

    Thoughts / suggestions? Does such a thing exist that I can build?

    Thanks,
    CP
     
  2. lumberjack_jeff
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    lumberjack_jeff Sawdust sweeper

  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A 45' displacement hull will give you about 8.8 knots of speed. For your expected speed you need a semidisplacement or slow planing hull. Those are, unfortunately, the laws of physics.
     
  4. CPperch
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    CPperch Junior Member

    So these designers that claim 10 knots displacement boats are peddling non-sense?
    If 8.8 is the number, then so be it. I am in no hurry.
     
  5. CPperch
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    CPperch Junior Member

    I think not on the 45' planing hull. Would hate to see what that will drink in fuel. If that is fuel cost prohibitive or not physically possible then we go a bit slower..........
     
  6. CPperch
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    CPperch Junior Member

    40 ft ambition

    Lumberjack, - Ambitious yes. But I have patience and time, but not the cash to buy something like that from a custom builder. If I want one, I'll have to build it. Success is often a matter of just sticking with it long enough to succeed.....

    And after all, we are just talking and dreaming today, but that is where things start. I like Devlin's Sockeye - 42 lots!

    I really like the Pelicano on your site. I have the plan, wish is was a 20 footer with a bit more beam.
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I would think that whoever makes those speed claims is selling snake oil.
     
  8. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Look at Chesapeake Marine Designs Redwing 40 LRC, its not going to reach that speed but should meet most of your SOR.
    Steve.
     
  9. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    viking north VINLAND

    From your post, doing it in steps I assume finances are tight. Do you have a starting budget--a slush fund to get started-- If say you have 5 to 10 thousand as a start up fund --In reality 10 would be an ideal minimum, do as i did on several ocassions, look around for a hull to complete or convert. There are plenty of them out there where guys have started the dream but run out of time,energy and money. The hull is the most challenging part of the build, Purchasing good tools, learning to use them, location, protection from the elements, heavy work ( big pieces to assemble) ample stock of supplys, finding reliable semi-experienced help, and a thousand other things that I could fill a page with from my past experience. Thats why as i got older i stuck with my plan of (sad to say) benifiting from others hard work and expenses, although I have to admit most were happy to be relieved of the nightmare of work and money they had gotten themselves into. Next to a home build a big boat build is the most arduous and expensive task a man will face in his lifetime. Renovating, completion, or converting, brings it down a step-- still hard work but easier to accomplish in smaller steps. Not always the case in the past but experience has taught me to proceed as follows: Once you have decided what you want and it sounds so, start the search, on locating a find, -hire a surveyer, a surveyer/designer would be better and a surveyer/designer/builder would be the ultimate to do a good survey. If it's an acceptiable find, keep the designer and builder close at hand on as need basis or find that combination willing to be so. Then work your *** off for the next 3 years and don't lose your spirit otherwise --------
     
  10. Chuck Losness
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    Chuck Losness Senior Member

    CP
    Buying an existing fiberglass trawler even if it needed some work would be a faction of the cost to build a boat for your needs. Look on the diesel duck website for the cost to build a diesel duck. Several of the home builders have posted their costs and they are all above $100,000 with the average being over $150,000 if my memory hasn't failed me. Unless you are looking for something truly out of the ordinary to fit a particular need there is no reason to build. The typical double cabin trawler meets your SOR. Just a thought. Good luck with your project.
     
  11. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Chuck is correct. The used market is very depressed at present. Very good time to purchase a top quality design that needs refit.
     
  12. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    Depends on the starting budget--many can't swing that initial $25 to $50 thousand layout without borrowing for a craft of this size that needs refit, Be great if it can be swung as most of the work is done. On the alternative, most can afford a $10,000 slush fund outlay for a bare hull to get started and then complete it as funds become available. One still has to come up with 10 to 20 percent of the cost for storage and weather protection. A rule i follow is i never borrow for any non essential item, especially so in todays economy. I agree 100% with Chuck and Michael on the refit idea but regardless which route you take, start off with a well surveyed and sound product--
     
  13. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    Hi All - slightly off topic but my first big build was 40 ft - see "my little piece of peace" ... It may pay to think outside the box and look to a catamaran, 21 ft beamOA and 40 ft LOA is nice and comfortable with 2 x 21hp saildrives I get 6.7 knots at 3000 rpm on one engine and better than 10 knots with both... If I built again I would build in grp covered marine ply of the same or very similar design, move the engines forward about 18inches move the aft "wall" about 2ft 6 inches aft (to the end of what I call the now "duckboard area"), and inboard forward of the bridgedeck extend the 45 degree chamfer up to the deck level... Heaps of space on board... Comfortable in most seas (except a short steep beam on sea)... can carry a pair of genoa for reach to running under sail... 2 miles per litre at 6 knots... Draft of 3 ft... 4000 to 5500 kg (depending on fuel carried) for a range near 3000miles in fair weather equivalent... Look more to your needs and cruising grounds than what may appeal because it looks very pretty...
     
  14. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Retired fishing boats can be had quite cheaply.

    Also look into retired BC forestry boats-many variations,built out of all materials and designed for inspecting forestry operations up and down the BC Coast.Pick on from more recent years
     

  15. CPperch
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    CPperch Junior Member

    Thanks all for the advice

    All comments / suggestions appreciated. Had not considered searching for a started hull -excellent idea.

    While I want to complete the build "out of pocket", and inexpensively, I am capable of supporting the project financially and could, if so inclined, cough up cash for the right deal. There will be no going in debt for a boat.

    Yes, I could buy something and would consider it for the right deal, but those boats that have caught my eye, some of Devlin's larger designs (there is a used Sockeye 42 for sale at $625k), the Diesel Ducks (have not seen one used for less than $300k), Tad Roberts designs, othere far too expensive to purchase outright or have a custom build. And I want that pride of having done it myself. Built a house, remodeled a couple, have the tools and shop, am past the age of youthful exuberance, I can do this. Fully realize the spend will amount to >$100k, but over 4-5 years and out of pocket is much more desirable than a boat loan or raiding the retirement account.

    Not interested in a 'glass boat.

    Thanks again and keep the thoughts coming!

    CP
     
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