Help with best houseboat hull design?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Victorytrihull, Apr 17, 2013.

  1. Victorytrihull
    Joined: Apr 2013
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SoCal

    Victorytrihull Junior Member

    I'm building a dayrunner houseboat from scratch so I went to a scrape yard today looking for 6061 Aluminum 12" pipe tubes. I found some tubes, but the scrape yard also had a big aluminum V hull boat and a large rectangular flat bottom aluminum tank. I got some new ideas from looking at them.

    I would like your opinion on which one of these 6 hull designs would be the best for stability when not moving, payload capacity, and least important, handling while moving at say 15 mph, and why?
    I'm thinking F for stability and payload, and A for handling. Am I correct?
    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 471, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There will be very little difference with stability between A and F. A is essentially a flat bottom, while F is a flat bottom. F will have a slight edge in displacement, hence capacity, but not a significant amount. The others are just very draggy and shouldn't be considered.

    Without further information about what you're attempting to do, I can offer little else. Have you done a GA and weight study yet?
     
  3. Victorytrihull
    Joined: Apr 2013
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SoCal

    Victorytrihull Junior Member

    I'm calling it a dayrunner houseboat, but it is going to be more like a self-propelled barge/dock with a deck and canopy. The middle section in the drawings is a flat bottom, open top, split in the middle tank. Haven't measured or weighed it accurately yet, but its roughly 5' wide x 12' long x 18" deep and about 3/16" thick. The final overall size cant be more than 8'6" wide but the length can go up to about 20'. Tomorrow I hope to clean it, measure it and weigh it at the scrape yard. the tank may be too heavy to be useful. Im still playing with the idea in my head. What is a GA? The scrape yard also has a huge aluminum boat that Im going to take a closer look at tomorrow too when they take it down off a huge pile of scrap with a crane for me. It may be better for my project. I will post more accurate info tomorrow night. Thanks for your help Par
     

  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 471, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If it's a barge/dock thing, then the shape isn't particularly important. A box would offer the most capacity, though these don't propel very efficiently. A GA is a General Arrangement and is a sketch of what you want, with all the stuff you want aboard. With this you can estimate weights and figure out how much boat you need to support it and how it'll trim out loaded up, plus crew, supplies and a safety margin. The eyeball method just doesn't work, unless you have years of building experience and will stick with something you've done countless times previously.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.