help the beginners

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by ian laing, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. ian laing
    Joined: Feb 2008
    Posts: 10
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    Location: vancouver canada

    ian laing 74 22.5' fiberform

    i just bought an new old boat and I am sure ther is allot of rot under flooring (stringers) I don't plan to buy traler as I will rent one for the couplr times a year I will get to go out .. which leads me to my first question what is the best way to store my boat on blocks that I can work on structural aspects of the boat with out destroying the hull.
     
  2. AroMarine
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: Atlantic City NJ

    AroMarine Junior Member

    ian, you did not say what type of boat or dimensions. Need a little more info to help/
     
  3. rotfix
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: austin

    rotfix Junior Member

    you'll be keeping it at the marina's yard? i'd imagine they can help with some of it, done it before sort of thing.
     
  4. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    How you store the boat will depend on the shape of the hull. A round hull presents different problems than a hard-bilged hull. Assuming the boat is a hard-bilged motor boat, the outer edges (chines) will be well supported by the truss-like characteristics of the sides. Stay completely away from weakened areas where stringers are soft unless the support surfaces are large and fit the shape perfectly. Check symmetry as you block the boat up using whatever means available (sticks across top of boat, cardboard templates, etc. If you repair the boat it will stiffen dramatically, so you'd best ensure it is symmetrical in your support system.

    Alan
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Generally, you want to support the boat along the centerline and at the turn of the bilge. Blocking her with large pieces of wood down the centerline is common. If using concrete blocks, insure a wooden spacer is inserted between the hull and block. Along the turn of the bilge, you just need supports to keep her from rolling on to her side as you work on her. A few home made stands, shimmed into place will usually do.

    Since you've mentioned your desire not to buy a trailer, it's likely a hard chine powerboat and that is small enough to be manhandled or lifted by a chain fall. Blocking her up level can have several advantages, so this may be something to strive for.

    A cover to keep out weather is also important. I usually make a tent over the boat, so I can work under it, in the weather. Photos will be necessary for more specific information.
     
  6. ian laing
    Joined: Feb 2008
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    Location: vancouver canada

    ian laing 74 22.5' fiberform

    thank you all for your replys if you send me your email adress at mine ianlaing@hotmail.com I have several pictures of the boat. it is a 1974 22.5 ft. fiberform cabincruiser with fly bridge. the current engine is a 69 ford 302 (no good) and a merc. 188 leg.(not sure of condition)
     
  7. ian laing
    Joined: Feb 2008
    Posts: 10
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    Location: vancouver canada

    ian laing 74 22.5' fiberform

    I have put an image in my profile of the boat so you can all see it
     

  8. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    yep par has it, also you can use oildrums (with wood on top) under the chines
    Oill drums are aesthtically pleasent, should keep the neighbours happy
     
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