help me-battery placement and ventilation-CE

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by jollyricard, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. jollyricard
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    jollyricard Junior Member

    Dear ALL,

    help me!!!!
    I must insert in my boat some batteries; where do I put them? As per European Directive i should ensure appropriate ventilation, Can I create a comunication with the external environment ?


    Many thanks in advance
     
  2. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    How about the engine bay, if you have any.
    You didn't provide any info on your boat or the batteries, but the engine bay is where batteries go. There is basic wiring there, plenty of ventilation and usually a lot of space you don't want to use for other purposes.
     
  3. taniwha
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    taniwha Senior Member

    you can buy plastic covers that you screw in the opening of the lead cells, these small caps have a connection for a 8 mm plastic hose. You route this one 8 mm hose outside, min 400 mm away from any ventilation opening and problem solved.
     
  4. Ike
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Hydrogen is extremely light and disperses very rapidly, so any old hole in the compartment that is above the level of the batteries will do. As CDK said, the engine compartment is the usual place. Do not place them under settees, bunks, etc. Lead Acid batteries also give of acidic vapors that will corrode anything above them That is one of the reasons why ABYC and USCG standards do not allow fuel lines to be above batteries.
     
  5. taniwha
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Location: Pattaya, Thailand

    taniwha Senior Member

    here are the exact requirements as per International Standard ISO 10133 (DC systems):
    5 Batteries
    5.1 Batteries shall be permanently installed in a dry, ventilated location above the anticipated bilge-water level.
    5.2 Batteries shall be installed in a manner to restrict their movement horizontally and vertically considering the
    intended use of the craft, including trailering if applicable. A battery, as installed, shall not move more than 10 mm
    in any direction when exposed to a force corresponding to twice the battery weight.
    5.3 The batteries installed in the craft shall be capable of inclinations of up to 30° without leakage of electrolyte.
    In monohull sailing craft, means shall be provided for containment of any spilled electrolyte up to inclinations of 45°.
    5.4 Batteries shall be installed, designed or protected so that metallic objects cannot come into unintentional
    contact with any battery terminal.
    5.5 Batteries, as installed, shall be protected against mechanical damage at their location or within their
    enclosure.
    5.6 Batteries shall not be installed directly above or below a fuel tank or fuel filter.
    5.7 Any metallic component of the fuel system within 300 mm above the battery top, as installed, shall be
    electrically insulated.
    5.8 Battery cable terminals shall not depend on spring tension for mechanical connection to them.
     
  6. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Although the above regs are common sense they do not seem to include the best position for the performance of the battery, such as short cables, being able to disconnect and top up. An Isolator would also be required.

    It would help what boat it is and engines or engines.
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Agreed, the boat year, make and model would greatly simplify the reply options.

    Frosty, you have to assume a qualified or experienced person will install the battery(s). You can't nurse maid them through everything. Battery boxes, locations and cable runs are logical and reasonable for any reasonable wire twister.
     
  8. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    PAR,
    reasonable? do you mean sane? LOL
     
  9. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member


    Crikey --they mean bulldog clip as in jumper cables.

    Yes and make sure the battery is the right way up and the filler caps are at the top.:rolleyes:

    When securing the battery dont drill into it to fit self tappers or nails
     
  10. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    And if you need to lift a battery, don't use a coat hanger run through the terminals. (yeah, I saw the after effects, it didn't quite connect until the guy lifted. He got a nice stripe across his hand. ) Also, if you're calibrating the battery temp sensor with a mercury thermometer, don't break the thermometer. If you think a good reference thermometer is expensive, try a 5000# steel cased submarine battery. And don't stick your multimeter probes in the electrolyte to measure cell voltage- if it was good, it isn't any more.

    We aren't supposed to use wing nuts anymore, let alone jumpers, however, every sailboat I've ever been on had batteries under a sittee. The compartments was not air tight though. I don't like to put a battery in the engine room because it tends to be at a different temp than the house bank and I leave the banks combined at all times except during engine start. My start batt is in a laz nearby and is identical to the house batts. These are little boat battery tactics.
     
  11. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    Hi jollyricard,
    At least get an electrician familiar with and qualified to work, in the voltage you are using - - to check things out (some auto-electricians may have suitable competence - especially if they know and have worked on MODERN trucks and RV's & mobile homes...)

    I used AGM batteries as they are inherently "safer"... Start batteries, (a separate 12v for each engine), are NOT in the engine room and are open to ventilation and visual access...

    House bank is 24v and is totally independent, being charged by 8 PV panels and a stand-by small petrol generator and a special AGM capable battery charging controller that will also service the engine start batteries if needed...
     
  12. jollyricard
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    jollyricard Junior Member

    ok, Can I put batteries under beds of the boat in order to Fulfill in the same time the exact requirements of the ISO 10133 ?
     
  13. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    Beds? Do you mean berthing? Places people sleep? You can, there is no prohibition but it is not a good idea or practice. First the space needs to be ventilated regardless of whether it is a lead-acid, AGM or gel. Lead acid batteries give off corrosive vapors that will eat the bottom of the bed. What about wire runs? How long is the wire run from the batteries to the panel or whatever they are powering. That is going to require some very big cable.
    How are3 they going to be secured so they won't move.
    If these are Lead Acid how will you get to them to service them?
    Also consider the weight issue. How big are these and how much do they weigh? How many are there? What will be the affect on the boat if you put that much weight where you want to put it?

    Look at taniwha's post for the ISO requirements. Whatever fits those you can do, but that doesn't make it a good idea.
     
  14. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Its not clear how many batteries you are fitting.

    A thousand amp hour bank under charge generates substantial heat. You can imagine that on a hot summers night whoever is sleeping in the "Battery Bunk" or Battery Cabin " is going to be sweating it out.

    Big battery banks must have ventilation to disperse this heat. When packing batteries into their box consider the effect of heat on the core batteries , the ones in the center of the stack. High temperature is the enemy of batteries.
     

  15. taniwha
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    taniwha Senior Member

    According to ISO 10133 yes nothing stops you of placing your batteries under beds. If it is a good idea is another question.
     
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