Hello from Toronto

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by sailingmonica, Oct 22, 2009.

  1. sailingmonica
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 28
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    Location: Toronto, Canada

    sailingmonica Junior Member

    Just found this site, posted a question and I have already received excellent answers. Thank you for that.

    I thought we should introduce ourselves and even though there is a story behind the story, maybe for another thread, the sum and substance of our designing and building our own boat is as follows:

    We moved to Canada from an ex communist country in Eastern Europe 16 years ago, in our mid 30's. It was illegal to own a vessel propelled by anything other than oars where we came from, and we could only dream. We were astounded to see the abundance of craft of all kinds on this side of the Atlantic but the cost was prohibitive.

    Then, my husband was laid off from his job as an autobody technician. One day I came home (to our small, rented house with a big lot) and I saw my clothesline laying on the grass and him walking alongside it. I asked what was he doing and he said "I am building a boat". Huh?

    That was in 1999. We were living off my $15 an hour (diet is good for you), while his $15 an hour (got another job, of course) were buying the materials. We worked every evening after work and all weekends. The hull, deck and bulkheads were finished by 2001 and we moved it to a marina, as the owner of the house got married and wanted his house back. The internal led ballast was already in, we bought 5 tons of scrap led and melted it piece by piece, then poured it into forms, then chain-hoisted it in.

    He bought me a jigsaw and told me to start the woodwork. I am an accountant, but lucky enough to have had a father who wished I was a boy and instead of building me a doll house taught me how to build it myself. I did it all.

    He then bought a used VW Jetta Diesel car for $300. Took out the engine, rebuilt it (he is actually a car mechanic but could not work as such in Canada as he needed a Canadian licence) and marinized it (used a heat exchanger from a school bus). The engine is still in the boat, working flawlessly. We then did all the plumbing, electrical and so on. Took sailing courses in the meantime.

    The boat was commissioned in 2004. We left for a one year cruise in 2007, right after we celebrated our 30th wedding anniversary. We came back to refill the credit cards so we can go again.

    That's pretty much it.
     
  2. sailingmonica
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Toronto, Canada

    sailingmonica Junior Member

    ...and here she is

    Pictures of MONICA. Feel free to ask any questions.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Welcome to the forum.

    Ok so the first step is to walk beside a clothes line. Seems like the logic approach :D

    Well done on the build. Most never get past the walk beside the wash line :D

    How do one do that :D
     
  4. sailingmonica
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Toronto, Canada

    sailingmonica Junior Member

    Fannie, it's the hardest thing.

    First, you go to work every day. You rent a room from your son, not your own house or apartment. Drive a 1993 Toyota that you bought for $600. Cook at home. Buy groceries at Walmart and only what's on sale. Never eat out. Never go anywhere. Cut your own hair. Buy clothes from thrift stores.

    But, if at the end there is another year of cruising, it's all worth it.
     
  5. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Fannie eh ! :eek: I wish :D

    Been doing all that forever and the cards are still empty. I could stop eating tho. One guy here tried to teach his horse to stop eating. He was on the brink of getting it right when the darn thing up and died.

    A day, a month, a year... it's why we all are here. It's true, water and boats are addictive.

    Be nice if you can up some more pictures. Each one learns a bit.

    One more Q. When your cards are filled up, are you going to leave all of us here by our lonesome ? :D
     
  6. sailingmonica
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Toronto, Canada

    sailingmonica Junior Member

    No, Fanie (sorry about misspelling before), when I go cruising I take all my friends with me in my heart.

    What pics would you like? Inside boat, outside boat, places I've been?
     
  7. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Whatever you feel like posting, sailingmonica :) The northern members of the forum are now packing their babies up for the Ice & Snow Season and need to live vicariously through boat stories and pictures, else we may risk becoming sane over the winter. I have a funny suspicion that I saw that boat a couple of years ago.... I don't spend much time in Toronto though, too much traffic....
     
  8. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Hi Sailingmonica,

    Well, for one, the layout and why like that. Every one has a different reason for their setup, not always logical at first but when explained it may make sense. Remember the idea is to learn from others and to widen one's thinking.

    Most boat pictures are the big thing sitting there from all angles but very little detail is showed. It may be that you chose certain taps or a basin for a reason, how does your water system work, there may be some nifty idea in there, what pumps do you use. There are so many things one can review and learn from...

    Don't get frozen to the boat though. I'm thankfull our winters are not so severe, must be terrible.
     
  9. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Sailing Monica. I just found your new thread. I am glad you and your family made it over here and I really enjoyed reading your story. I'm not a Canadian but I have always found them to be nice people. I am sure they made you feel welcome and I hope you can stay free.
     
  10. sailingmonica
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Toronto, Canada

    sailingmonica Junior Member

    Hoytedow, I must say you folks down in Florida are so nice it's hard to leave. We had our shaft coupling give way and we were coming into St. Augustine inlet with all engine mounts broken. We stopped to fix the problem and we ended up staying for three months!!! The locals found out my birthdate and threw a party at the marina for me, so I won't feel sad being away from home and all. We then moved on to Vero Beach, Stuart, Palm Beach where we spent another two months. Anywhere we went we made friends for life. We exchange emails every day since we came back. In fact, we ended up not going to the Bahamas because we ran out of time and had to turn back North. But I have no regrets, as Florida is really my second home now. Thank you for everything.
     
  11. sailingmonica
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 28
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    Location: Toronto, Canada

    sailingmonica Junior Member

    Fanie, I never thought anyone would be interested in how we built the boat, hence no pictures of systems and such. I will battle the elements for you (kidding, it's really not that bad - yet) and will provide pictures and stories to go with them.

    Be safe in the meantime.
     
  12. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Is it Ferrocement Monica?
     
  13. sailingmonica
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Toronto, Canada

    sailingmonica Junior Member

    Matt, hold in there, it will be spring before you know it. I always consider winter to be over after the Toronto Boat Show, it helps me retain my sanity. I must admit I did not miss winter when I was down South.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Nice pictures!
    I like your pet! Is it "potty trained" ???

    And let me say: your distress signal equipment isĀ“nt bought on tight budget, is it?
     

  15. sailingmonica
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Toronto, Canada

    sailingmonica Junior Member

    No Apex1, is is not ferrocement. It is hand laid fibreglass, 3/4 inch thick above waterline, 1 1/2 thick below waterline and almost 2 inches in the keel area (internal balast). We alternated different types of fibreglass as each had different characteristics. The final outer layers were six of mat, because it seals better. Also, the mat layers allowed for an almost perfect finish, hence the final fairing was minimal.

    In case you are wondering, we built first a male mold upside down and began laying the glass on it. Once the hull was finished we flipped it up using a system of wooden beams and chain hoists like in Roman times. Then, we removed the inside structure and the mold itself and to be on the safe side we slapped two more layers of fibreglass on the inside. When in doubt, make it stronger is our motto.

    We then built the deck and pilothouse and glassed it to the hull. The deck, however, has a plywood core with four layers of fibreglass on the outside and two on the inside.

    I have lots of pictures from the building stage but they are all on paper. Will try to find the actual film and perhaps I can post some.
     
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