Hand laminating forward vee

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by fallguy, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Any tips for hand laminating 3 layers of 22 oz triax into the forward vee of a hull? I am laminating up onto the sides of finished panels. The panels are about 24-30" high and the vee'd section starts at 2' wide and goes to zero in about ... call it 10'. Reaching over is possible, but hard to do and there are frames every 90cm.

    Shimmy board of say a 2x8? Maybe I need to make a trolley for me even? If I tape the board, I'd slide easier I suppose, but my 215# doesn't move too easily.

    Midgets?

    Planned for partall#10 with pva spray, but now am wondering if I should try release film instead. Only last time I used that film, it shattered awfully easy. I could use a combination of release film and partall as well.

    Getting the vee'd part is going to be super tricky. Do you guys think I should start by making a bigger radius of some milled fibers? I think my current mold radius is 1/2" or maybe 5/8".

    Then, wet on wet, or get one done and let it tack and go again? Thanks. It will be tricky, so any advice is helpful.
     
  2. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    I may not be understanding this, but what is the Partal#10, PVA and release film for?
     
  3. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Sorry, but I was planning to use partall #10 over partall #2, but also wondering about using release film now either as well or instead. The forward section of a 32' cat hull is made of about 12' of plywood about 10" wide each bonded together at the bottom with cabosil and epoxy with a 5/8" radius (or so). (call it a canoe mold) That section is to be laminated into the vee and up to the corecell panels on the sides (developable panels). As an added measure of complexity, there are rebates on the panel edges and I planned to set in one rebate on the top side of the veed section (into the upper edge of the canoe mold). That rebate would allow two extra exterior laminations-tapes (there will also be another lamination that goes over the entire bottom and those tapes. I'll go take a picture for you. It'll be easier to understand.
     
  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

  5. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    So, the picture is tipped on its left side. The left panel is to be laminated Friday and next week we'll try to laminate this 12' long vee. I cracked the bottom of the vee if you look close and will repair. The vee is painted with white paint. If you look close, I also broke a small top piece I added as a filler (it is laying in the bottom). The right panel is laminated and still has peelply on it. None of the panels are attached right now; they are floating right now, not when we laminate.

    At the bottom of the core panels, you can't see it, but there is a 1" relief angle in the 1/2" core. (the unlaminated one is a to do tomorrow).

    The hard part of this job is making sure I don't get any epoxy bonding at the bottom of the corecell panels and onto the mold (stuck boat in mold), and reaching and accessing the vee to laminate it and maybe keeping the fiberglass on the core. I can see that I will need to put a massive fillet in the front of the cored panels so the glass will lay down easier. Just wondering if any of you guys have ever faced something like this one. I can almost reach into the sides if I make some scaffolding on each side.

    And then the radius is about 5/8" in the bottom. Is that decent? Too little?

    Do you guys think I'm going to have trouble holding the fiberglass onto the sides? I'm thinking maybe I'll need to raptor it on..

    Thanks for any tips.
     
  6. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Now I understand what you're doing. You may have another thread discussing it that I haven't read yet.
     
  7. jorgepease
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    jorgepease Senior Member

    I don't really see what is going on here. Why did you paint before glassing, why not just glass it all simultaneously after you have it filleted? Are you doing flat panel infusions. if so, then what do you mean about running the glass up the side? I think a nice fillet up front will solve the tight bend issue.
     
  8. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Jorge. The designer specified hand laminating 3 plies of 22 ounce fabric. The white section is just painted white and finished nicely for mold release. It is a mold. The glass needs to run up onto the corecell sides. I bought a raptor stapler today to help make sure the wetted glass stays on. The only other trouble is the vee is 12' long and I can't access 12' of it from the inside and keep laminating more over the top. The only way I could do the work from the inside is if I piece it with say 4', 3', 2' pieces and keep overlapping them, then, perhaps a final piece later.
     
  9. jorgepease
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    jorgepease Senior Member

    Oh sorry, I didn't realize it was a mold )) ... I have used the raptor, mine kept jamming on me but it works fairly well. Seems like the wetted glass would stick of it's own accord?
     
  10. Tungsten
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    Now i see what you mean,its the hull or bottom part your talking about.Ha thought it was the stem or bow V.
    So the bottom is solid glass i guess and i see what you mean about it being a ***** to get that all to line up flat and make a nice straight V when you pop it out.
     

  11. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    A simple scaffold makes it much easier to do a good job.
     
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