Gravy Boat, Custom Albin 25

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Yobarnacle, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    Exactly correct there young man, I just tracked it down before receiving your e mail. From what I can gleam from the drawings of this engine and the CPP drive system to the prop it is similar if not exact to that used on my MD7(A). By retaining the CPP control unit (looks like a small transmission) you have prevented any engine oil loss. I have taken a few photos that might come in handy down the road. They will at least give you an idea of the mechanical make up. The MD7 I have is actually 13.5 hp.beautiful running engine, removed because John was having problems with the CPP unit jamming in reverse. We now think it could have been a loose set screw not allowing the shifting rod/sleeve to activate the prop blades. It was his intention to change out for a new set up regardless in prep for his trans Atlantic next June. Like yourself I became the benefactor for a very reasonable amount -- I love the barter system :D
    The photos in order are,
    The CPP control unit(looks like a small transmission) which I understand you have not removed from the engine.(red tape on the shaft preventing keyway loss)
    A close up of the back of the engine where the CPP control unit with shafting/sleeve tube is connected.
    The coupling piece that mechanically connects the CPP and it's drive shafting/sleeve assembly to the engine output. Note the oil seal.
    The coupling piece bolted to the engine. This piece would normally be fastened to the shaft and be part of the CPP control unit but for ease of display I have separated and installed it on the engine here to give you a better idea of the oil seal situation.
    Hopefully this might be of some insight to what you might be facing if you have to further modify the CPP shafting you have retained on your engine ---, Keep the hatch wedges tight,-- Geo.
     

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  2. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    thanks Viking
     
  3. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    I want to build more suspense about the accommodation layout.

    So far, I've mentioned a chair for my Mrs and a tub recliner for me.

    In a 25 footer, every sq inch should count. Multifunctional is desirable.

    Bunks are used for settees in many, even expensive yachts.
    Sure, that's multifunctional, but is it comfortable?

    Comfortable seating should have a bit of rake to the seat, and some for the backrest.
    Rear slope seven degrees off level for the seat and 15 degrees out from plumb for the backrest is about the average. The included angle 98 degrees. Seen as much as 100 and as little as 90 degrees. You can experiment with finding the ideal rakes for you.

    Do you really want to sleep on an inclined plane?
    Sure a sailboat heels under sail and all boats roll, so sleeping off level is the norm.
    Amazing what you can get used to.
    Don't you look forward to a quiet anchorage in protected waters, so you can get a GOOD nights sleep?
     
  4. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    What makes a comfortable bunk?
    A recliner! No, not really. :D

    Lots of things can create discomfort.
    Lack of temperature control, lack of ventilation, too hard, too soft, too cramped, too exposed, too narrow, too public, too boxed in, insecure, unstable, too precarious, too much light or noise.

    Too crowded!
    Enjoy sleeping together with your spouse?
    Forget the double or queen or king size mattress.
    Get a hammock to share. You're going to get jammed up together anyway, from the movement of the vessel.

    I have in mind an alternative use for a bunk, that makes it multifunctional.
    Passageway.
    A padded tunnel open at both ends, so you can emerge in two different places.

    'Gravy' has a tunnel berth. Extends from the aft cabin to the forward cabin.
    Good ventilation! Not claustrophobic.
    Feeling exposed or too public?, just retreat down the tunnel a few feet.
    Want to sleep with your spouse but not jammed up?
    Sleep foot to foot and play footsies, or flip around head to head for an intimate chat and some kissy face.

    'GRAVY's tunnel berth is 18 feet long, and almost completely horizontal except.

    Except at the two ends, where ultimately it acquires a comfortable seat bottom angle of seven degrees.

    Stay tuned for more craziness! :D
     
  5. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Quarter berths are only dead-end tunnel berths. Usually quite comfortable.
    Currently in construction on opposite side from the tunnel berth, will be a quarter berth.
    For a surprise overnight guest or when my wife wants the entire 18 foot tunnel berth for herself and her pillow collection.
    Bunks are only shelves or large cupboards for temporarily storing people when they're shut off. Wish bunks weren't needed, but they are. Use up too much space.
    The hammocks in the old sailing ship days were a higher grade technology. Space efficient, portable, inexpensive, easily repaired, and gimbaled.

    Tables and counters:
    Of equal importance and greater versatility, as chairs. Frequently go together.
    These are work spaces and deserve careful planning.
    Whether it's the work of fueling your body, or preparing the food, or maintaining clothing, or reading, writing, planning on a chart, repairing electronics, working at your computer, playing games, socializing, ect. Don't under estimate the value of well designed tables.
    There is a table nearly constructed which will be mounted in front of my wife's arm chair. It's both wide and long. thirty inches by four ft. It is a 2 inch deep shallow tray affair of fiberglass for holding her nail colors and face paints, creams, lotions, perfumes, hair brushes, combs, eyelash curlers, tweezers, scissors, files, and other asst instruments of torture.
    With a hinged lid that flips up for access to the tray and a mirror attached to underside of the lid so it's safely protected when the lid is flat.
    When the lid is shut, the table can be used for eating and for other work less essential than my wife prettifying and admiring herself.
    I admire her too.
    Having common interests are important in marriage. Our's is successful because we are both in love with her!

    I plan a portable chart table that has wooden cleats beneath so it can sit securely on top of the bathtub/recliner as a standup NAV station, and is equally accessible from the other side while seated in the tub. Table stores in a rack beside the tub.
    So does a twin work bench table, for working on messy electronics, fishing reels, or engine parts. while seated or standing, and stores on the other side of the tub.
    Various other countertops, and small tables wherever they seem useful.
    Some pictures, not the tables, other stuff, in next post.
    Hang around. :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2016
  6. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    It is good to see your project in print, having already seen it at the "Skunk Works", which nickname may mislead the reader. The marina is a superb facility for the DIY guy or gal.
     
  7. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    In the 1ST picture you can see the eyebrow upside down on the cabin top.
    You can see the hatch coaming installed in the cabin roof that formerly was on the focsle. In it's place on the focsle, you can see the pointed cabin etension I added. And you can just barely see the line where the hatch lid sits in the top of anchor locker, the locker that I'll use for water hose and shore power cable and in summertime as location for the air conditioner.

    Close to the camera on the right, is an ear shaped bracket being constructed, one of two, to bolt on the eyebrow.
    Since the boat will be travelling down the highway at speed, bolt on parts need to be WELL bolted!


    IF IT'S CONFUSING, THIE 2ND PICTURE HAS LABELS :D
     

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  8. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Thanks Hoyt.
    Feel free to post any of your pictures here, from when we did sea trials of your home design when you towed it over here.
    Always great to see you and chat with you.
     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

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  10. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Originally the big square hole in the roof of wheelhouse had a canvas top.
    Rotted so decided to replace with a lightweight UV resistant material.
    I want shade and ventilation and protection from wind and the first few minutes of a rain squall..
    Chose vinyl soffit sheathing with 30 year UV protection.
    Perforated so heat can escape, very light weight, cheap, and waterproof, and easy to wipe clean.
    The eyebrow is necessary to protect, and prevent wind ripping off, the vinyl roof when trailering at high speed, and also shades the windshield as a bonus.

    [​IMG]

    Be patient. Eventually I'll show the finished project. Dragging it out, so you'll appreciate the effort it took! :)

    The panels snap together, but are intended on houses, to be fixed in place by fastening with staples or nails to soffit framing.
    Not the use I made of them. Tried several glues, and found construction adhesive in the caulking gun style tube for $7 works great.
    You can click on the glued up panel picture below.

    Talk about that hatch I relocated from bow to cabin top.
    Showed the coamings a couple posts back.
    Here is a picture with the cover on.

    [​IMG]


    Of all the fiberglass in the Albin 25, only this hatch cover was poorly made.
    Albin may have purchased them from an outsource.

    The FRP was thin, and embedded in the top surface was hardboard. Perfboard material.
    No better than compressed cardboard, sandwiched between 2 very thin layers of glass.
    I ground out the hardboard, and rebuilt the hatch cover to 3/8 inch minimum thickness FRP, more in the corners and edges.
    I incorporated an arm off one corner.

    This arm is integral to an experimental hinge .
    I dislike flip open hatches on deck.
    When open, they're upside down, forming a basin to catch water and dirt.
    The contents of the hatch lid falls on you and the boat's interior, when you close the hatch.
    In my mind's eye, I imagined a swiveling hatch, that didn't invert when opened. But raised up to clear the coaming, and rotated to the side, and laid on deck with the underside tray basin aimed down. Catches nothing.
    I wanted a strong hinge.
    I believe I overbuilt it. I screwed a trailer hitch ball upside down into the underside of the hatch arm.
    I cast a thick fiberglass cup and laminated it to the deck. You can see a little, but not details in photo.
    The hitch ball is retained in the cup, by a clove hitch of stainless wire cable around the ball throat and secured in the cup.
    The hinge works well, but the components could be half this size and still be more than substantial.

    More weirdness to come. :D
     

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  11. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    I thought I was making 'PROGRESS'.
    Hey, 'Progress' would be a good name for a home built boat! Making Prog.....
     
  12. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    A boat shall not be created with fiberglass alone.

    OMG, What IS it?

    Part of my propulsion system.

    [​IMG]

    Way-back on page 1, mentioned I'd removed and glassed up ALL the thru-hull fittings below the water line. That included the raw water intake for the engine.
    These items make a raw water intake unnecessary.
    One of my good friends, a Chief engineer, at my request, calculated the size of keel cooler I would need for my 10hp diesel, and totally unexpected, he told me where to get one. An oil cooler from a GM 671 was the perfect size as a keel cooler for my little plant. I got one FREE off a scrapped 671, since the Chief was friends with the engine repair shop owner.
    The 2 gallon stainless expansion tank, I dug out of the dumpster.
    A bit larger than I need, but can't have too much coolant.
    Nowcool and water will be the liquid used in the system.
    The keel cooler gets installed under the stern in the area where the spade rudder used to be. When the bow is planted in the mud, the stern will be kept in good water depth. Otherwise, I won't park in that spot.
     

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  13. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Yeah ok, but where is the collapsible Flettner rotor? :p
     
  14. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Not forgotten.
    Just can't afford it yet. :(
    Keeping a close eye on the dumpster and any wrecks hauled in for dismantling!

    Picked up a thrown away inflatable rib, that I considered the tubes might be repurposed into a rotor. Too rotten.
    I did get the fiberglass bottom as a main cabin sole, molded nonskid. And I cut off two rubber cleats I'll use where a ridged cleat might snag the Genny.

    I hold your opinion in high regard. Any comments, ill, good, middling, of my 'GRAVY' boat?
     

  15. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    The rib I cut the bottom out of furnished this concave nonskid textured cabin sole.
    All the windows in the Albin came with automobile safety glass instead of plastic. They are all removed and stored, so the rain blows directly in, hence the puddle.

    These photos were awhile ago, and Hoyt saw the cabin at this stage.

    The tub recliner has a strongly sloped back, a seat and a footwell.
    I hinged it to the forward bulkhead so I could tilt it up for access underneath.
    The bulkhead is painted yellow, and a little bit is seen. It's the bulhead I showed cutout of salvaged fiberglass.
    A house battery box goes under the tub , holds 3 batterys. You see it in the first picture at the forward end of cabin sole.

    When I bought the recliner tub, I was given a shallow fiberglass shower tub.
    Almost didn't take it, but decided it would make a decent bunk facing for the main cabin end of tunnel berth.
    You see it and the chair I made for my wife, and a bit of the battery box that gets glassed in under the tilt up tub/chair.
    The colors on my wife's chair were a joke.
    I told her I made her a Mexican chair.
    Sent her a picture of the chair painted wild tropical colors. :D
    She likes it!
     

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