Good Small Passenger Vessel Recommendations?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Hookerup, May 10, 2012.

  1. Hookerup
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States,Florida

    Hookerup Junior Member

    I operate a private sunset /scenic/dinner cruise business for up to 10 passengers.
    Right now we have a 26 ft regal leisure cat and it does the job....but drafts a little to much,sprays forward of the bow at planing speed, cavitates alot.. and in general just feels wrong.

    I would love to have the interior on the lines of a Duffy picnic launch. But would need something that could do 20 knots. Draw 18 inches or less, stable and somewhat dry.

    Was thinking of finding a old 24-26 ft mono hull with a wide beam and shallow vee . Like a t craft or Robin. Then make the interior like a picnic launch...put a canopy on her and outfit her with a four stroke out board for effciancy and quietness and put some awlgrip on the hull.

    Anybody have any ideas or recommendations for a similar vessel or design. And i am trying to do this cost effective.....
     
  2. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 5,920
    Likes: 316, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2488
    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Welcome to the forum.

    Before you embark on a "I want this type of hull", have you looked at the rules and regulations of operating a passenger vessel in your location? Passenger rules are very different from leisure. Also depending upon how your surveyor wakes up in the morning shall depend upon what tonnage calc's he applies. Which shall dictate your crewing requirements too. (Only the US does this??)

    Thus, I would recommend you look at or find similar sized passenger vessels, that run a service or similar to which you require. Then ascertain what crew requirements and admin side for all the health and safety regulation you must comply with, vessel and shore based.

    After that, then see if you wish to run a passenger vessel service and then what would be suitable, given what you discover.
     
  3. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 4,225
    Likes: 182, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1485
    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Since the original poster identifies himself as from "United States" an important question is state waters or federal waters?

    If it is federal waters then to carry over 6 passengers for hire the vessel will need to be "inspected" which includes stability requirements. (If it is a very large vessel over 100 tons and the limit is 12 passengers without passengers. International readers need to understand that the term "inpsected" has a specific meaning different than ordinary english in this use.). Consult a knowledgable naval architecture for advice on whether a particular hull configured per your ideas would be able to carry as many passengers as you desire.

    If state waters then you need to meet the requirements of the particular state, and the services of a naval architect will probably be needed.

    Don't rely on someone telling you that a boat "just like" the one you are considering is carrying passengers for hire. "Just like" may not be close enough, or the rules may be different for where you want to operate. I know of a case where a boat was purchased on the basis that the builder said similar boats were being used to carry 12 passengers. That is apparently correct but it is 12 passengers where the boat doesn't need to be inspected. It is unlikely the boat will meet USCG requirements for 12 passengers on federal waters without substantial modifications.
     
  4. Hookerup
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States,Florida

    Hookerup Junior Member

    Ok you guys are getting off subject here..lol
    I am familiar with the inspection process and safety regulations for a small passenger vessels operating in inland waters. A lot of paperwork and some wait time,but should not be a problem for 8-10 passengers depending on stability tests.
    This vessel will just be operating in the ICW of Florida
     
  5. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 795
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 324
    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    The Regal Cat vessel you are running now does not meet the USCG requirements for a vessel taking more than 6 passengers for hire in US waters.

    As DCockey said, you need an "inspected vessel" to carry more than 6 passengers. It does not matter if you are on the ICW or offshore.

    Ron Cooper makes USCG inspected catamarans in a wide variety of configurations, a small used one with 4 cycle outboards would be a good place to look.

    http://www.coopermarine.com/

    You also need to be a USCG licensed "captain" to take passengers for hire on any vessel in any US waters. Any water cop could make your life very difficult ( and put your license in jeopardy) if they were to determine you were taking more than 6 passengers on an un-inspected vessel, and all the water cops in Florida know these rules.

    I believe you need to re familiarize yourself with the applicable regulations, your comment "but should not be a problem for 8-10 passengers " is incorrect.

    Steve
     
  6. Hookerup
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States,Florida

    Hookerup Junior Member

    Thats strange ... CG told me different, But what do they know...LOL

    I thought this site was Boat Design for some reason.
    So once again...if anyone has DESIGN ideas for the above stated application i would love to hear of them .
     
  7. Part Time
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 22
    Location: Portland, Or

    Part Time Junior Member

    The question of if the vessel must be USCG Certificated for passenger service is very important. The ICW is considered a navigateable waterway and would be subject to CG jurisdiction. Any boat carrying more than 6 passengers for hire, less than 100 RT will need to be designed and built to meet 46 CFR 175-185. This includes being built to either ABS, Lloyds or DNV scantlings. The boat will also be subject to stability testing. Most boats built as recreational vessels will not pass the scantling review process. So the design and choice of vessel is very much dependant on the regulations governing its commercial use. Most USCG certified small passenger vessels are purpose designed to pass the regulations. The Tcraft and robin would be a bit light to meet either ABS FRP or High speed rules. You should look at existing boats with a certificate of inspection that meet your requirements. Just make sure that if you are buying a boat from another area that the local Coast Guard inspections office are contacted prior to purchasing. That way you can be sure the boat will meet any additional requirements in your area.
     
  8. Part Time
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 22
    Location: Portland, Or

    Part Time Junior Member

    Make sure that you ask the correct Coast Guard office. You should call the CG Sector closest to your operation area and ask for the commercial vessel inspection office. If you ask the local search and rescue station you will likely get an incorrect answer. Get the answer in writing, an e-mail works best and be sure that the person you are speaking with is a commercial passenger vessel inspector. .
     
  9. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 795
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 324
    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    If anyone at the CG told you you could take whatever boat you want and take 8 -10 pax, they were wrong.

    You asked for designs for a vessel taking 8 to 10 passengers for hire in what we assume is US waters. That field is very narrow and I supplied a source for appropriate vessels in my previous post. The smaller designs of those catamarans meet all your design criteria including USCG approval for 6+ pax.

    There are some catamaran taxi's here in Ft Lauderdale that are outboard powered that might be able to operate in 18" and they too are inspected vessels. See the video here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9m6OYcqBBQ

    And some pictures here:

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.498807533746.303647.48973533746&type=3

    I couldn't find any pictures of the exact boat I had in mind, they used them as ferry's to the Miami Boat Show in past years, very shallow draft, outboard powered, less than 30ft.

    You might be able to pick one of these up used.

    Steve :cool:
     
  10. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    As a guy who also runs a charter business, I have to agree with most of the posts above. You are strictly limited to a 6 pax on any uninspected vessel. It's one of the most basic things there is to know about running charters. Rule #1.

    Rule #2 is that you need at least an OUPV to run even that.

    Definitely get it right, because in the event of an accident, without all your i's dotted and t's crossed, you will lose everything, plus many years of your life. It's nothing to screw around with.
     
  11. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,180
    Likes: 128, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1082
    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    ... so go find an experienced boat broker who will find you a fixer upper and handle the upgrades and nursemaid the project through CG approval. It's like hiring a General Contractor to oversee your new house even if you plan to be on hand yourself. They will expedite everything and get you in business in a reasonable time. Will cost less than dockage or insurance I imagine.

    Sorry for the tough love approach here, but the impression given was that of either inexperience or a scofflawish attitude. Neither are likely to encourage the pros here to help you take folks out with you. This isn't a hard thing to put together. Just go do it and make sure you have the budget to see it through for a few years.
     
  12. Hookerup
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States,Florida

    Hookerup Junior Member

    Thanks for the info.... I had originally thought of a commercial pontoon boat because they are the the cheapest, Most,efficiant, probably the best riding, shallow draft vessels to operate. Its just hard to swallow the appearance factor.
     

  13. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 795
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 324
    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    Another Florida builder of commercial inspected catamarans:

    http://www.corinthiancatamarans.com/our_boats.htm

    Steve
     
    1 person likes this.
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.