Good Resources for learning about boat design and marine grade materials

Discussion in 'Education' started by Cmw505, Aug 16, 2019.

  1. Cmw505
    Joined: Jul 2019
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    Cmw505 Junior Member

    Hi So i'm alittle green around the gills with my knowledge of marine grade materials i have been at this for a few months now and i have book(outdated) and i've also been around the internet for awhile and i can't really find any good resources on it. What i'm looking for is resources on wooden boat building and trying to find out which metals are marine grade etc and how to set up a frame for boats(ribbing, keel design, battens stuff like that) thanks!.
     
  2. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    What type of boat and size of boat are you contemplating?

    What type of wooden boat building - traditional plank on frame, sheet plywood on frame, "stitch and glue" plywood, cold molded, strip, a combination of several methods, etc?
    For "modern" construction using epoxy a good reference is "The Gougeon Brothers on Boat Construction" which is available as a free download. Gougeon Brothers on Boat Construction book - WEST SYSTEM Epoxy https://www.westsystem.com/the-gougeon-brothers-on-boat-construction/
    WoodenBoat carries several good books on various types of wood boat construction. Boat Building Books https://www.woodenboatstore.com/collections/boat-building-books
    'Building Small Boats by Greg Rossel" is a good introduction to several types of wooden boat construction.
    "Marine grade" by itself is generally just advertising hype. The suitability of metals for use in boats depends on the application, whether the boat will be used in salt water or only in fresh water, and the amount of maintence. Also very important is possible interactions between different metals and the resulting corrosion. Galvanized steel, stainless steel, bronze and aluminum but themselves may be suitable but the wrong combination can lead to major problems. What type of boat are you contemplating?
     
  3. J Smythe
    Joined: Jul 2019
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    J Smythe Junior Member

    Principles of yacht design by Larson and Ericson is a good start imo. Covers the entire design spiral.
     
  4. Cmw505
    Joined: Jul 2019
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    Cmw505 Junior Member

    thanks for the responses! well end game i'm looking at a schooner 56ft and that's big i know especially for an amateur but i come from an engineering background so i'm pretty confident i can do this although i would rather start on the dinghy before the main thing and if there's one thing i know it's go big or go home. the method i looked at was carvel planking at first but it seems rather a poor choice now some i'm exploring other methods like strip planking or cold molding but definitely not clinker i know what i'm going to use the schooner for and where it's going so i have kept four things i would like to see come out of the design. one thing i can't figure out what to do about is those blasted worms(teredo navils) and i'm also looking to minimize environmental damage because i've read about the actual effects of biocides in anti-fouling while i already know alternatives require more maintenance that's a sacrifice i'm willing to make.
    Thank for the redirection to the book mate that's a huge help the one i have was published in 1941.
    i'm looking for at a modified full keel and a round bottom displacement hull with two alumnium mast with gaff rigging.
     
  5. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Pick a construction method and build a dinghy first. Keep track of your time and costs.
     
  6. Cmw505
    Joined: Jul 2019
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    Cmw505 Junior Member

    will do mate thanks!
     
  7. J Smythe
    Joined: Jul 2019
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    J Smythe Junior Member

    I think the frame construction / hull build would keep me interested, but the multiple iterations of "sand the hull" required later would make me throw in the towel and start hiring people to help.
     

  8. Cmw505
    Joined: Jul 2019
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    Location: USA

    Cmw505 Junior Member

    oh i'm going to dread sanding it down ha ha but it'll be we'll worth it in the end
     
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