Fuselage frame History??

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Kudzu, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. Kudzu
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    Kudzu Junior Member

    Looking for any information anyone might have or references you might know of to the History of Fuselage Frames in boats. I am writing an article and would like to have some facts. About all I have found it is that is probably started in the early 50's maybe late 40's after the war, when cheap plywood became available. Past that I don't have a lot more info.
     
  2. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Describe what you mean by fuselage frame.
     
  3. Kudzu
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    Kudzu Junior Member

    Yes, I guess I should. Many people in kayak circles call it "Yost style" after Tom Yost who did a lot to raise awareness of it. Plywood frames with wood stringers running the length of the boat. Covered with a sythetic skin. This is primarily used in kayaks, canoes and some other small boats.

    I am not talking about traditional Skin on Frame with lots of small ribs.

    Here is an example.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    That is called "skin on frame"
     
  5. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Canvas over stringers over frames construction in North America goes back well over a hundred years. W. P. Stephens in "Canoe and Boat Building. A Complete Manual for Amateurs", eighth edition, 1898 has a section on "Canvas Canoes". The method described uses wood stringers covered with canvas, but the stringers are bent around molds and then ribs are steamed and bent into postion inside the stringers. It would not surprise me at all if others at that time or earlier were using sawn frames instead.

    Klepper built kayaks with flat frames and stringers starting around 1907. Folboat built many, many kayaks with flat frames and stringers starting in the 1933.
     
  6. Kudzu
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    Kudzu Junior Member

    Good reference, had not seen that book and found it online. I was surprised at how far back this idea goes. Probably even further than this.

    Thanks!
    Jeff
     
  7. HJS
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    HJS Member

    Canvas Canoe 1884

    The Swedish small boat designer, author and Commander Carl E Smith published a drawing and a description of a canvas canoe in "Tidning för Idrott “ (Journal of Sport), in 1884. He was married to a lady from New York and had good contacts with the United States. It would not surprise me if he had taken his inspiration from there. In his library I have found,” Webb; Manual of the canvas canoe, NY”.

    js
     
  8. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    Skin on Frame exactly ( Gonzo that answer was so compact and precise i almost missed it) :) I'll expand, This is the traditional building method of our Northern Peoples of both our countries. Instead of ply they used bone or drift wood or cut actual saplings if they lived near a forest. The technique is theirs, the more modern materials ours but we have to give credit where it belongs. Geo
     
  9. Kudzu
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    Kudzu Junior Member

    Yes is skin on frame but that is like saying it is Wood Boat. It doesn't tell you much, is it Carvel, Clinker, cold molded, plywood, etc.
     
  10. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Well, if skin is read literally, that should answer the issue. I doubt that it is known how far back the native skin boats go. Kayaks, umiaks and other more floating carriers. European boats from the Irish and doubtless many others in areas where trees were not plentiful qualify for that designation also.
     

  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Maybe you could narrow the question more by defining what you mean by "fuselage"
     
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