Fuel coming out side of carburetor?

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by Catfish Howard, Nov 6, 2021.

  1. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Stealing a line from Mr E, I believe.

    But the first thing to do is buy the service manual.
     
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  2. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Rumars Senior Member

    As the man said, buy the engine service manual. Then look on youtube how to clean carbs, and apply what you learned. Clean your fueltank (preferably by steam), change fuel lines and filter, clean pump and any hose fittings. Buy new synthetic 2 stroke oil and fresh gas, if premixing use the manufacturers ratio (you know, actually calculate and measure that 50:1). Buy new sparkplugs, make sure they fire (could be as simple as a new set of leads). Reinstall clean and rebuilt carbs, take the manual in one hand and adjust them as written.

    Cleaning the carbs will be a seasonal chore, it pays to learn how to clean, inspect, rebuild and tune them. Running premix or oil injection is a matter of personal preference. If the oil injection system is reliable it's superior, but premix can't break down, although premix depends on the operator doing a proper measuring job.
    Ethanol gas has nothing to do with your current problems. If you let an oil rich premix made with mineral oil sit for two years it will transform into grease whatever gas you use.
     
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  3. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    I haven't found a manual for my motor 1991 Johnson 60 TJ60TLEIB. I don't mine buy one if it's for my motor, not something similar.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    That engine you should be able to find a manual for, being a very common engine at the time, and for many years, the 3-cylinder 60-75 hp Johnson/Evinrude. It won't be specific to that engine, but likely won't need to be.
     
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  5. SolGato
    Joined: May 2019
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    Location: Kauai

    SolGato Senior Member

    I missed that this is a 2-stoke not that it makes much difference with regard to carb rebuilding, but it does explain the black oil looking substance found in one carb making it less likely to be hose residue.

    You can always take a fuel sample to make sure your hose is okay.

    One other important thing I forgot to mention that some forget when replacing fuel supply line, is if you are using a typical auxiliary plastic tank, they usually have a prefilter at the pickup tube in the tank. The screen or even tube itself on this can go bad, get clogged, or disintegrate and end up in the fuel line sometimes even building up behind the ball valve at the disconnect restricting fuel flow or fouling the ball valve causing it to leak when disconnected. Since it usually spends the majority of time sitting in fuel, I find it’s always worth replacing as it also helps to keep crap in the tank and out of the bulb and ball valve.

    Ignition troubleshooting is a matter of starting with the basics. Making sure the system is getting voltage, making sure the coils are good, wires, plugs, etc..

    If it doesn’t turn over at all (assuming it is electric start) or won’t fire when pull started, check all ignition interrupt switches. Typically one at the shift linkage, maybe one for oil pressure, and the kill switch. A lot of times shift linkage gets worn and the switch can get out of sync with shift positions.

    If it turns over or pull starts without producing spark, and you have power to the coils and ignition, and it’s not an interrupter switch, and the coils measure out, it could be ignition related.

    Manuals are great to have, but a lot of this stuff is just basic troubleshooting.

    I recently bought a motor that ran like crap off idle and made no power. Started fine and otherwise ran fine, however I noticed it would build crankcase pressure and was stinky and it would kick back a bit on a restart. I suspected a timing issue and remembered the previous owner mentioning he had the timing belt recently replaced and that the motor idled high and didn’t make the power it used to at high rpm. I immediately suspected that the timing was off and the motor was too far advanced and that the cogged belt must be off by a few teeth. Sure enough, I discovered the cam and crank were out of sync. So I removed the belt and put it back on with the cam and crank properly aligned, and it now runs and idles perfectly. Even smells pretty good!

    Anyway keep at it and you’ll figure it out.

    One important benefit of clean well adjusted carbs with regard to outboards, is it allows you to achieve a proper low idle which makes shifting much easier on the lower end.

    How many times have you been at the ramp and heard motors idling way too high clunking in and out of gear, sometimes so badly you actually see the motor kick?

    No thanks. I much prefer working on the top end rather than destroying the bottom end.
     
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  6. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    Yes, 2 stroke, 50:1 mixture. I just replace the plastic 6 gallon tank and bought new fuel line/ball from West Marine. I've had trouble finding the fuel lines on-line so I was going to take my hoses to West Marina and see if they have them in stock.

    My starter was only working sometimes where I had to hit it with the paddle to get it to popup. Since my starter wasn't working the other day I ran a cable from my positive terminal on my battery to the starter bolt and when the motor turned over none of the plugs had spark. I can do any work around the house form framing, tile and plumbing but I'm no electrician. I'll see if I can find a repair manual to see how to test the things you listed, I have a tester but I just don't know what to test?
     
  7. SolGato
    Joined: May 2019
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    Location: Kauai

    SolGato Senior Member

    I don’t know your motor specifically, so this is all just basic troubleshooting tips as others have offered.

    Ignition-wise, most newer motors use some electronics in their ignitions systems. The thing about electronics is that they need specific voltages to operate. Too little and they don’t work, too much and they get destroyed.

    So the first thing to do is verify your battery is good. That means making sure it can deliver 12+ volts under load. You can test this by using a voltmeter on the battery while trying to start. If the voltage drops significantly, the ignition system may not be seeing enough voltage to provide spark. Remember a battery can test fine at rest, but may not work under load so it’s important to test while loading the battery.

    Once you verify a good battery, check all grounds and connections between the battery and motor. Next verify that the ignition system is getting 12V. From there move on to checking the resistance of the coils, inspect wires, then spark plugs.

    When checking for a spark, I like to use a timing light rather than removing plug and leaving it grounded agains motor.

    Also in general, it’s unlikely that 3 separate ignition coils might go bad. But if they are all fed by the same power, that single point source would be more likely. Same can be said about wires, plugs, carbs etc.. The more independent components there are, the less likely they are all bad and it more than likely something up stream feeding them. So if you aren’t getting any spark to all three cylinders, it is more than likely to be something that performs a job for all cylinders like an ignition box, battery, ignition switch, ground wire, etc..
     
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  8. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You can just about check all ignition components with the use of an inexpensive multi-meter and the manual telling you what range the readings need to be within, this business of guessing something might be the cause, is simply inadvisable
     
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  9. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Rumars Senior Member

    That my friend is simply impossible in this day and age. All you have to do is type OMC 0507948 and presto, somebody wants to get rid of one. Plenty of offers in fact, for example this one with the misleading title but the correct picture:
    1991 OMC Johnson Evinrude Cross V Models 60 70 HP Service Shop Manual 507948 | eBay https://www.ebay.com/itm/133925880372?hash=item1f2e9ac234:g:09gAAOSwmbdhPhBv
     
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  10. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    Thanks I didn't see this one, the ones I seen were for like 10 years worth of motors. I will buy one for sure.
     
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