FreeShip on Linux?

Discussion in 'Software' started by djwkd, Jan 4, 2010.

  1. djwkd
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Newcastle-Upon-Tyne

    djwkd Senior Member

    Hey,
    has anyone got FreeShip compiled on Linux? And if so, how?
     
  2. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Gulf Coast USA

    kengrome Senior Member

    I used to run it in Linux under wine a couple years ago and it worked fine. I just tried it again a week ago with a new Linux OS and it frequently (but not all the time) fails to recognize my use of the control key, so I am running it in Windows now.

    I was thinking of trying to run it in a VirtualBox Windows installation but I don't think this is worth the hassle because I can reboot into Windows in a couple minutes and it works fine in Windows.
     
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  3. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    I used this version whilst researching my options.... http://freeship-plus.pisem.su/indexEN.html Now I am building an Oram 39-C... I have not used in over a year... I use Linux Mint of Ubuntu... on all 3 machines... dual screen is convenient and facilitates more rapid 3D manipulation and tweaking, - I tried a tablet or whatever those touch surface cad devices are called, with not much success... Enjoy the challenges (There is a pdf manual which was a big help as the two versions - same/similar name - are vastly different... even though they arose from the same beginning)...

    Downloads here http://freeship-plus.pisem.su/indexEN.html
     
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  4. djwkd
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    djwkd Senior Member

    Actually, it works in WINE. Haven't really tested it much, but it runs, and I can change views and things.

    But I have little use for something like this...I build rafts, not boats.
     
  5. BPL
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    BPL Senior Member

    Ken, I know it has been a year, but any update on running on linux instead of windows?
     
  6. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    kengrome Senior Member

    I'm now using the latest version of FreeShip Plus under wine on Ubuntu 11.04, and although I do not use every feature of the software, all the features I have tried seem to work perfectly.
     
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  7. BPL
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    BPL Senior Member

    Thank you for the update Ken. That is good to hear. I am thinking of making the move to linux, but it's hard to get over the inertia of changing systems.
     
  8. CmbtntDzgnr
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    CmbtntDzgnr Senior Member

    Some anecdotes...

    Baby steps or whole hog, it will take some getting used to unless all you know is that you are committed. Still, there are not 100% analogues.

    OpenOffice.org is in many ways useful and interesting. But, I have emotional attachment and certain efficiences connected to using Lotus SmartSuite (mainly Approach, WordPro, and 1-2-3, in that order).

    As for CAD, we know there are at least 3 commendable vendors who make CAD in native Linux or cross-platform.

    As for browsers, Firefox replaced KDE's explore about 99% for me.

    As for local file exploration, Dolphin is so-so, but irritates me that the cursor focus ALWAYS starts on the right. But Dolphin and KDE both support 2 or more split file tree views in a single pane, and that is useful and thoughtful when doing mass file moves or comparisons, rather than having two complete explorer/file browsers open.

    KDE (and, IIRC) Dolphin both have consoles so you don't need to work in a separate "DOS"-like command line window.

    KDE/Compiz/Metisse/Plasma offer some really nice eye candy that (if set up correctly and you don't screw around with it too much after config) will bedazzle those who need or seek desktop distraction.

    There are some disadvantages, too, but are avoidable:

    When updating your preferred distro, DO NOT install everything under the sun just out of curiosity. First, get what you NEED. Statilize your system. Have a cloning or backup plan in place unless you are comfortable getting your hands dirty (either via the console, various tools, or sheer reinstalls). Have a test machine so you don't mess up your "production" machine.

    Excessive installation can sometimes lead to breaking a critical, hard-to-find file. It is not supposed to happen, but can, and sometimes happened to me.

    I'm not any kind of expert. I just have been tinkering with and using it mostly happily since 1999/2000. Caldera, SuSe, then Mandrake (before !hurst! forced them to change names to the weird Mandriva, which is a munge of Mandrake and Connectiva), then PCLinuxOS. I tried but could not stay with RH, Fedora, Ubuntu, Centos, and a few others. SuSE & Open Suse lost me after a while for various technical issues and (at that time) their ability or likelihood to survive. Mandriva too had issues, but certain technical (probably marketing-based) matters drove me away. PCLOS won me because of the live boot feature, which re-enabled me to use my dying Sony Vaio back in 2005/6 when the hard drive controller failed and I could never again use local hard discs on that laptop.

    Most of the big ones are best if you are not geeky/nerdy. Entry level users can be comfortable with Mandrake, PCLOS, and Ubuntu.

    Also, do not try to be too cutting edge with certain laptops. It can be disheartening to find that the modem STILL can be an issue, and not RJ-11 modem, but wireless modem options. Also, certain sound cards that by name are popular are intransigent or stalwart at making it easier for all the distros to work right after post-install reboot. Sometimes, EVERYTHING works just fine on a live boot, but then after rebooting, mysteriously won't work. Fortunately, many laptops today come from merged or consolidated companies and sometimes brand won't matter - just pick the main things like RAM, CPU type & speed, LCD size, keyboard layout, bag-fittability, weight, and HDMI/USB (2.0 or 3.x), and so on.
     

  9. BPL
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    Location: Home base USA

    BPL Senior Member

    Thank you CmbtntDzgnr.
     
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