Free Vessel PLANS

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Barbaros, Jan 26, 2008.

  1. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 50
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    INTRODUCTION
    In a series of discussion (text and pictures), I would like to submit to the community of this site the PLANS of a 13m X 4m long Vessel free of charge.

    While progressing, we may hope that there will be a collaborative work around this proposal and each one will participate to improve and/or to correct the final set of plans.

    At the end, similar to "Open Source Software" in computers world, the PLANS should be available to anyone who whish to build his own unit.

    This Vessel is designed to carry two people with enough comfort through European Canals or USA costs, rivers and lakes ... or somewhere else around the World.

    1.1.jpg
    1.1.jpg


    This is the virtual picture of what the Vessel may look like if someone whish to build it. The hull is supposed to be build in steel, aluminium and/or with some minor modifications using wood epoxy as material. For now, the priority is given to steel as preferred material.

    The shape of the hull is mainly for Coastal Navigation. But, probably with some precautions, she may navigate in open seas up to Category B.

    It should be clear that no responsibility shall be taken by people who participate to the forum, if one builds the Vessel and sunk right out of the harbour. By the way, the author as Yacht DESIGNER, will not accept any responsibility by offering these plans to the public. The builder of the Vessel, should verify through his preferred Naval Architect or using his own knowledge and experience the seaworthiness, stability and whatsoever is useful before engaging the construction.

    1.2.jpg
    1.2.jpg
    View from the aft.

    1.3.jpg
    1.3.jpg
    Front view.

    Starting with the next section, we will have a closer look to how the plans are started and elaborated using a very popular and easy to use software : Rhino. Please visit : www.rhino3d.com for more information about Rhino3D.
     
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  2. eponodyne
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Upper Midwest

    eponodyne Senior Member

    merci, merci beaucoups! C'est tres genereux, et oh la la! Quelle bateau!


    Sorry, that's about all the French I can remember for right now, but what a nice thing to do! If only I could use Rhino instead of staring stupidly at all the numbers and lines....
     
  3. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Free Vessel PLANS 2

    Rhino and Naval Design.

    Each step, since the very first lines, are going to be clearly explained, exposed and discussed. The final "Computer Files" will be public for construction. They could be either "Offset Tables" for DIY builders. If there is any request, "dwg", "dxf" or "iges" file formats could be published for CNC.

    2.1.jpg
    2.1.jpg

    First, the Vessel's shape or arrangement is straightforward. Starting from the bow to the aft, the major sections are:

    1 - A "Chain locker" isolated from the following "Large Space" by 1st "Watertight Bulkhead".
    2 - A "Large Space" to fit one or two cabins with shower and toilets behind the 1st bulkhead.
    3 - Enough space under the sole (or floor) to hold tanks and reservoirs.
    4 - A 2nd bulkhead almost in amidships to separate the "Large Space" from "Engine Room".
    5 - Behind the 2nd Bulkhead, the Wheelhouse with galley, day salon and helming position in upper level and
    6 - An Engine Room underneath with some space for "Fuel tanks".
    7 - A 2nd "Watertight Bulkhead" at the aft (final position not decided yet) to isolate the Engine Room from the aft portion. Notice that, the Engine is located in a strange "Keel" like a large big box, welded under the hull to save some space. This could be named as "Box-Keel" using the same terminology as "Dave GERR" in "BOAT STRENGTH", page 251.
    8 - In the aft some storage space accessible only from the aft deck using a watertight hatch cover.

    All the description above, will become clear with more details in following paragraphs.
    2.2.jpg
    2.2.jpg

    Such design gives the priority to "Northern and Colder Regions" of the "Globe". Mostly, the owner whish to live inside of some structure, well protected from bad weather conditions.

    13m (approx. 42.6 feet) doesn't give to much flexibility in terms of space. Sorry, there is no "Flying Deck" (standing up on the roof of the wheelhouse may give some headache; bridges are very low).

    Now, we may have a closer look to the structure of the Vessel using as much as possible the technical terms used by professionals such as "Dave GERR", "Ted BREWER" and "George BUEHLER" etc. Any further reference to one of this celebrities and also others, will be clearly mentioned in the text.

    ---------

    First of all, a word about some figures which is easily obtained from Rhino using

    Bounding Box will give :
    --------
    LOA :14m12 X Beam : 4m35 X Draft : 1m and the Air Draught 3m40.

    This latest parameter is important for European Canals. Also, the "Beam" should remain below 5m for a large majority of locks in France. The maximum authorized length is 38m. It's a good idea to have a "Draft" less then 1m40.

    This plans are going to use "millimetres" exclusively because the steel welding and cutting professionals in Europe claim and work only with this system. The conversion should be assumed as : 1" is about 2.54cm (or 25.4mm)

    The following figures are obtained using : Analyze -> Mass Properties -> Hydrostatics of Rhino3D:

    70cm
    Volume Displacement = 1.31191e+010 (13 tons or cubic meter of water)
    Centre of Buoyancy = 138.374, -1.48876e-013, 456.701
    Wetted Surface Area = 3.69914e+007
    Waterline Length = 11234.6
    Maximum Waterline Beam = 3755.09
    Water Plane Area = 3.24696e+007
    Centre of Floatation = -128.724, -6.33319e-012,700

    Which should be interpreted as : "In order to sink the Vessel by 70cm, the overall weight should be around 13.11 tons.

    80cm
    Volume Displacement = 1.64877e+010
    Centre of Buoyancy = 71.2517, -6.81144e-013, 516.747
    Wetted Surface Area = 4.06736e+007
    Waterline Length = 11507.2
    Maximum Waterline Beam = 3890.32
    Water Plane Area = 3.48969e+007
    Centre of Floatation = -249.238, -1.05897e-013,800

    For 80cm of "draft" the Vessel must Weight 16.48 tons. The following figures are for more Draft and of course more displacement.

    90cm
    Volume Displacement = 2.00948e+010
    Centre of Buoyancy = 3.16351, 5.34575e-013, 576.663
    Wetted Surface Area = 4.43484e+007
    Waterline Length = 11769.7
    Maximum Waterline Beam = 4001.94
    Water Plane Area = 3.71663e+007
    Centre of Floatation = -365.71, -1.46581e-012,900

    100cm
    Volume Displacement = 2.39079e+010
    Centre of Buoyancy = -65.1947, 5.19981e-011, 636.272
    Wetted Surface Area = 4.79268e+007
    Waterline Length = 12018.6
    Maximum Waterline Beam = 4038.29
    Water Plane Area = 3.90535e+007
    Centre of Floatation = -484.628, 5.78386e-010,1000


    The following figure shows the "Propeller's" position in terms of distance to the surface of the water (or LWL) for a Draft of 1m (approximately 3.2feet ).

    This is a quite critical choice and there could be not enough water above the propeller. The diameter of the propeller is 70cm (approximately 27.5 inches). For the size of the Vessel, it's a big propeller!.

    The calculation about Engine Power and Propeller dimensions are inspired from "Propeller Handbook" of "Dave GERR" and will be published in later chapters.


    2.3.jpg
    2.3.jpg
     
  4. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Free Vessel PLANS 3

    THE HULL STRUCTURE

    The "frames" are placed close as much as 50cm (19.6 inches) from each other. This is a dense structure. According the "Scantling" recommendations in "Boat Strength" for a Vessel of this size, they may be spaced more than 1m (39.3 inches). Page 238 of "Boat Strength", provides the formula to let the space being 115 cm (46inch) for 19m long steel Vessel.

    But, welders in some shipyard will claim the closest solution to avoid -probably- the distortion of the metal sheet showing an "hungry horse" profile especially at topsides.

    A third solution will consist to let the space to 1m and add few "Longitudinal Stiffeners". Both solutions are acceptable.

    The bottom is build using 6mm steel plate and "Chine" with "Top Sides" are made of 5mm steel.

    For this set of plan we keep 50cm distance between each frame. Anything other then 50cm or 1m makes the construction complicated.

    3.1.jpg
    3.1.jpg

    The perspective picture above shows a global view of "Frames" spaced 50cm each from other.

    Also, one should notice the 1st and 2nd "Watertight Bulkheads" surrounding the "Large Cabin" area in front section of the hull (Ghosted view in Rhino3D brings some transparency).

    The "Bow" has a partial "Keel" made of a 10cm X 2cm steel piece which stops at 4th Frame. Details are going to be exposed piece after piece.
    3.2.jpg
    3.2.jpg

    Upper picture is the "Top View" of the hull with front "Bulwark" bent slightly inward. The strange shape toward the aft is the "Keel" section where the engine is going to be placed horizontally. More strange is the "Keel Cooling" box layout, which is explained further.
    3.3.jpg
    3.3.jpg

    Before they become satisfactory, the production of these few basic lines are the most time consuming work for a "Designer". Still this remains probably an endless discussion in terms of aesthetics and efficiency. But, no one will claim to win any speed competition on French Canals where the speed is limited. The sightseeing while visiting is the major occupation.

    The design of "Chine", "Bottom" and "Shear" lines may take forever until one says : "Yes … this is what I expect as shape". In some design process, nothing acceptable may come out after several hours of work.
    Let's come back to the hull. Stiffness of a strong steel hull is a must when you are manoeuvring in some tight locks. Protection of painting in both sides using plenty of fenders is another duty for the crew.

    3.4.jpg
    3.4.jpg

    After crossing several locks, the Vessel will obviously "bump" by side to a wall made in stone ...if it's not a frontal choc!

    3.5.jpg

    3.5.jpg
     
  5. westlawn5554X
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: home lazy n crazy

    westlawn5554X STUDENT

    Thanks... I find it easy now to study steel canal boat of european design... much pleasure... attached some point for you sir... 9 point
     
  6. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Free Vessel PLANS 4

    SOME DETAILS of the STRUCTURE

    4.1.jpg
    4.1.jpg
    The "Keel Cooling" is build using a closed loop circuit. The cooling water is in permanent heat exchange with outside. Also, it becomes possible to add "Anti Freeze" into cooling circuit to avoid engine breaking during winter. The capacity of this tank is around 60 litres. The surface in touch with outside water is around 1 square meter.

    4.2.jpg
    4.2.jpg

    4.3.jpg
    4.3.jpg
    The "Bow" is a rounded piece of metal sheet. It may require a "Patch" toward the bottom (rounding a triangular piece of steel could be very difficult even for the best professional).

    4.4.jpg
    4.4.jJpg
     
  7. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Free Vessel PLANS 5

    FRAMES

    Following pictures will show the global view of "Frames" spaced by 50 cm.
    5.1.jpg
    5.2.jpg
    5.1.jpg
    Two Fuel tanks are surrounding the engine. Each has the capacity of 1.6 cubic meters. The Vessel may carry more then 3 tons of fuel providing a good autonomy.
    5.2.jpg
    5.2.jpg
    The Batteries are in between the 2nd watertight bulkhead and fuel tanks. There is enough space to place from 6 to 8 of them.



    Detailed information for each frame will be provided soon.
    5.3.jpg
    5.3.jpg
    Picture below shows "Aft deck" covered. A wide opening (hatch) to access the engine at the floor (or ground) of the Wheelhouse is on the plans.
    5.4.jpg
    5.4.jpg
    5.5.jpg
    5.5.jpg
    Another internal view from the Engine ROOM toward the front.
     
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  8. ted655
    Joined: May 2003
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    Location: Butte La Rose, LA.

    ted655 Senior Member

    WOW! I may attempt to use Rhino again. I also would stupidly stare at it.
    It looks overbuilt transversely (width?) and weak long wise. Does it not need a thicker keel?
    NOT criticism, because I know next to nothing. That is a whale of a lot of frames for a metal boat, adding cost, labor, weight to a recreational priced boat.
    I think many Americans would prefer a forward pilot house/cudddy. You are spot on with the size of the boat. Thank you very much. :)
     
  9. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Tedd,

    You are absolutely right regarding the number of frames.
    The huge density of frames is a specific demand from the shipyard.
    (I don't know exactly why?)

    I think, if you remove one frame every two frames, she will still sail safely.
    1m distance (3 feet) between frames is quite good.
    ----------
    Regarding the pilot house, it could be moved forward w/some minor changes.
    Once I finish the PLANS for this one, we may work on the next version.
    If there is any demand, of course.
    Regards.
    Eric.
     
  10. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Free Vessel PLANS 6

    KEEL and FRAMES

    The "Keel" is a single piece of steel of 2cm thickness. It ends at frame
    number 4. The outer edge (extremity) is located at 2440mm from the
    frame 4 and the height is 3267mm from the ground reference "0". The
    following picture gives dimensions in X-Y axis.

    6.1.jpg
    6.1.jpg

    On the ground, the measures are given starting at 1400mm and every 200mm
    following the horizontal axis toward the Bow. The picture is more explanatory
    then a long text.

    6.2.jpg
    6.2.jpg

    The next picture is the dimensions for frame 1. It could be build as several
    flat bars or cut as one single piece from a metal sheet with some loses.

    6.3.jpg
    6.3.jpg

    Again, the dimensions are in metric mm. and they are given referenced to a
    flat ground surface. Every frame is made of 100mm wide X 6mm thick flat
    steel bar.

    A detail about the frame 1 is given in the following picture. This corresponds to the notch to fit the Keel in.
    6.4.jpg
    6.4.jpg

    The following 2 pictures shows "frame 1" on position fixed to the Keel.

    6.6.jpg
    6.6.jpg
    Profile view of frame 1 fixed to the Keel.
    6.5.jpg
    6.5.jpg


    Please remember, each frame is located 50cm away from the next one.
    The construction sequences or method is up to the builder.

    While building the front of the hull, it may appear more practical to start
    placing the "frame 4". Experienced people may have their opinion on the subject.
     
  11. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Free Vessel PLANS 7 (Download file)

    FRAMES.
    Starting with this last part, we will have a look to all frames giving the final hull structure.

    The plans are zipped and attached ready to be downloaded to your PC.

    The Frame 1 was explained in the previous section

    7.2.jpg
    7.2.jpg Frame 2

    All frame dimensions are given in "metric mm" as shown in the picture above. The frames are build using 100mm wide and 6mm thick flat bars.

    7.0.jpg
    7.0.jpg

    The picture above shows a clear vision of how to place the first 4 frames to the Keel.

    "Frame 4" along with the "Keel", could be used together as reference for the rest of the construction.
     

    Attached Files:

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  12. Guillermo
    Joined: Mar 2005
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    Location: Pontevedra, Spain

    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    What's the Base Line?

    Great contribution. Thanks.
     
  13. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Base Line

    Guillermo,

    Thanks for the remark regarding this "little" contribution.

    The "base line", if I understand the technical term correctly (which is not so sure), is the horizontal "Keel" line.

    All hydrostatic is calculated with hull only. The "Skeg" which extends toward
    the aft and holds the "Rudder" like an arm is important only for "Draft".

    When we talk about 80cm displacement you better add 20cm for the "Skeg".
    The adjusted "Draft" will reach 1m. But, of course in terms of "Displacement" the "Skeg" has no impact.

    Again, sorry for my very limited understanding of English language.

    Please do not hesitate if its not clear.

    Regards

    Eric.
     
  14. Guillermo
    Joined: Mar 2005
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    Location: Pontevedra, Spain

    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Eric,
    So, when you say: "The following figure shows the "Propeller's" position in terms of distance to the surface of the water (or LWL) for a Draft of 1m (approximately 3.2feet )", you mean 80 cm draft over the base line.

    Is maximum load draft (again over the base line) of 1m? (For a maximum displacement of 24 tonnes, aprox., as per the hydros). So, asuming the boat doesn't trim (does it trim by the stern when fully loaded?), you'll have around 30 cm of water over the top tip of the propeller (?). Then, isn't it somewhat inconvenient that kind of stern? Wouldn't it be better to have a no so quick rising stern? A flatter one still with submerged sections in that zone would avoid having the free surface just over the propeller, so improving efficiency. It could even be convenient to semi-duct the propeller.

    What do you think?

    Cheeers.
     

  15. Barbaros
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: France

    Barbaros Junior Member

    Free Vessel PLANS (7) Aft modified

    Hello Guillermo,

    You remarks are justified and I fully agree with you.
    Please have a look on following 2 screenshots.
    White lines are the original "curves". The red skin is the new hull lowered in the aft.
    The rudder is reduced a little. A semi-duct may be added on top of propeller.
    They are probably approaching what you are talking about.
    AftModif.1.jpg
    AftModif.2.jpg
    Obviously this will need a complete rework of PLANS.
    Perhaps (rev 2) will be coming soon with less frames and some longitudinal stiffeners.
    Thanks again and before I start to rebuild a new set of plans make your comments and remarks.
    Some frends on the forum mention the position of the "pilot house" which require a new "Cabin Layout" also ...

    Again thanks and regards
    Eric.
     
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