frames

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by nautical, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. nautical
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    nautical Junior Member

    hi guys

    Hope this is the place to post this one. since there is no separate place to ask on construction.

    whats a bent frame and a grown frame?

    thanks
     
  2. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    wooden boat forum is where you need be
    but a grown frame is just a frame sawn from the natural growth shape of a tree limb, and a bent one is one shaped by steam or other,
    Was in Turkey recently, they do a lot of wood building and there were natural knees piled up in a corner, for stems etc
     
  3. nautical
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    nautical Junior Member

    Thank you very much Lazyjack.
     
  4. nautical
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    nautical Junior Member

    sorry my bad. will post in the right place nexttime. Thanks again
     
  5. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    Lazeyjack (once more the bloody know all) is spot on with his answer. But if I can add a small 'historical' note: During Elizabeth-I's time in England there were a group of 'licensed' officials who wandered the countryside examining trees for likely and future 'shapes' for shipbuilding. Having found one they would hammer in an 'official' Royal seal. Anyone other than a Royal shipwright removing the said timber faced death by hanging. (well I thought it was interesting anyway...) :rolleyes:
     
  6. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    it is, very, Mate if I learn something everyday, and I do here, then life is enriched
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    As a young lad, I remember walking through more then one stand of trees, with an old guy that my father knew. I was supposed to be paying attention, but really wasn't at this age. He marked trees, branches and roots for cutting at some later point. He also bent saplings and larger, young trees, using wire. He was a local Chesapeake Bay builder and had a few projects requiring knees, frames, breasthooks and the like. He also knew he'd dug up or cut out much of the easy to find stuff, so he was making more by intentionally bending young trees that would later in life become single piece stems or keels. He was considered one of the most important men in the yard and held in fine reserve when his name was mentioned. I just remember a crusty old fart, that dragged me through the woods, when I'd much have preferred playing baseball.
     
  8. nautical
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    nautical Junior Member

    Very intresting stuff I am learning. Do any of guys know how good conconut palm wood is for small boat building.
     
  9. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    Never used it myself - but I'm told it's pretty porous and over a short time tends to 'suck up' water. But that's only what I've been told.:confused:
     
  10. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    useless coconut or any other palm, my garden full of it, and its all standing!! would,ve felled it if it had of been worth a damn
    yes par they still bend saplings in UK EU but mainly for hedges, they lau the new growth alongways, makes a really tight walrus proof fence
     
  11. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    The British government also at one time claimed any large straight (virgin) white pine in Maine for their use as ships masts. Didn't matter that the tree was on privately owned land.
    Which reminds me of a joke (allowable as a part of a serious comment threadwise speaking)...
    A British couple drove through rural Maine during the fall, a time we call leaf-peeping season as applied to tourists. They were beside themselves taking in the glorious autumn maples when they turned a corner and saw a tidy little house, outside of which an elderly local was raking leaves.
    Stopping, they gingerly approached the man and offered him a dollar for one exceptionally pretty leaf at the end of his rake.
    The oldtimer rubbed his chin thoughtfully, carefully surveying the leaf in question.
    Finally, after a long moment, he said matter-of-factly, "Hate to part 'm out, but I'd sell the whole shootin' match fer ten bucks."

    Alan
     
  12. nautical
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    nautical Junior Member

    Its always good to know some extra
     
  13. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    Dammit Alan, he charged me $20:(
     
  14. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    You gotta play it cool... pretend you only want to rent the leaf for a social gathering at first. Act nonchalant. Point out its flaws. Mention that a beloved friend has recently passed. You know the drill. Don't drool over the damned thing!

    A.
     

  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    To specifically answer Nautical's question, the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) tree is now being used in structural applications, as well as furniture and paneling. Personally, I've not seen any marine applications, but it may be suitable for some things.

    A quick glance at my USFS reference book suggested, it can replace the dwindling supply of other tropical hardwoods. These trees have their highest density of material, near the outside of the tree (dermal), which provides it's strength. Lumber found, progressively inward becomes softer (sub dermal and core material, respectively). It has a fairly good resistance to rot in processed products (Palmwood) available, though I suspect it will dull tools quickly with its high silica content.
     
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