fishing offshore in a rowboat.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by coopscraft, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. coopscraft
    Joined: Dec 2013
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    coopscraft Junior Member

    I am looking to build a small open rowboat for my own bottom fishing on the pacific near oregon(usa). I am hoping to combine as many as possible of the following criteria. It should be constructed of wood or plywood/epoxy. It should be designed to get the skipper home through an eight foot or higher surf should the need unexpectedly arise if I am blown too far away from the jetty. It should be able to carry 4 persons, each rowing, and yet be under the control of one average 30yo male with an american sized built in gut float. A small sail for backup and convenience and or 2 horsepower outboard might be worth considering. More than 2 horses changes regulatory cost round here. Should be able to survive being covered by a rogue wave with the crew still on board and able to regain control of the boat. Should be able to carry supplies and gear for "roughing it" overnight at sea. I intend to try to avoid bad weather but round here things can change in a hurry. I've seen video of modern coast gaurd ships thrown stem over stern within sight of land off the oregon cost. I am a capable woodworker having worked in wood furniture industry. I would like to see what available designs these criteria sugest as well as any advice regarding dimentions, displacement, length, constuction method in wood y'all might have.
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A small open rowboat that will get you home through 8 feet + surf ? Santa is hard pressed this Christmas, can you be a little less exacting with the specifications this year ? :D
     
  3. motorbike
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    motorbike Senior Member

    Been done before but you omit details such as weight and size limits. 26ft sounds about right, about 1000 kg i.e a lifeboat.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    There may be some bold rowboaters going through the icy surf, even the odd old rowboater doing same, but I guarantee there'd be no old and bold ones ! :rolleyes:
     
  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The classic ocean boat is a dory.

    A modern alternative is better.

    An engine wont help the boat..only your arms.

    A sail...to go upwind or down ?

    Most likely down wind...consider a kite.

    Mast , rigging and sails are cumbersome on a small boat that you will power with oars

    Study oceanic rowboats.. Miniaturize one, optimize for upwind rowing, then kite home

    Study oceanic kite boats

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  6. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Perhaps a drekar would serve?
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'd never heard of a drekar till now !
     
  8. NavalSArtichoke
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    NavalSArtichoke Senior Member

    Mission creep: Start out with a rowboat, add a sail, add a motor, room for four people, luxury accommodations, servants for the passengers, able to survive 8-foot waves ... wind up with the Queen Mary 2.
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    A dory wouldn't be a good choice, unless it has a half ton of fish on the slats and some white knuckled rowers that don't mind bailing as much as rowing. Really, 8' seas in an open boat? Other than surf rescue racing, are folks still willing to do this? How many times have you been in a small craft in 8' seas?

    What you're asking for is a lifeboat or survival boat, both of which are way more boat then you need 99% of the time. It's a bit like having a 700 HP V8 in a VW Beetle, just in case a sudden urge to run 8 second 1/4 mile times come over you, as you sit in a 15 MPH rush hour commute home the remaining 99% of the time.

    Maybe it would be best to start from an established SOR, based on your needs and experience, as most of the time I heard these "requirements" it's because the prospective owner "thinks" this is what they need, while never having actually experienced these sea state conditions. 8' seas aren't uncommon along the coasts, but few row through them and a 2 HP motor on a 4 man rowboat, will just laugh at the request to bring you home. How much rowing in deep water experience do you have? Is this boat going to have other uses, besides rowing? A boat large enough to handle 4 rowers in a surf, will be a bear to solo in the same. There might be a stock design for this, but frankly, it sounds way too specific and a semi or full up custom may be the only route.
     
  10. coopscraft
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    coopscraft Junior Member

    Love the drekar! Now I just need a small militia to help with the rowing:) it looks like the oceanic rowing boats are like a dory or seaybright with aerodynamic cabins for flotation and shelter. That might be a good start point. One thing that bugs me a bit is the wide diffetence between a good boat for four and a good boat for one. I left the size limit blank to see what the experts thought would be necesary. I have every intention of choosing conditions cautiously, but I don't want to be caught unprepared and offgaurd. The idea is a practical rowboat for daytrips offshore that is safe beyond the worst I want to see. Not intending to be a bold sailor. Could this be done in eighteen feet? My mommy says santa doesn't exist and I'll have to build this one myself. Boo hooooo :(
     
  11. Stumble
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    Stumble Senior Member

    Coop,

    The issue isn't 1 vs 4, it's 8 foot surf. There aren't a lot of 25' powerboats I would want to try and maneuver thru that type of surf, a rowboat of any size is going to be dreadfully overmatched in these conditions. In this size the only way to make a boat survive 8' is to make a lifeboat that can handle being flipped over regularly. Which typically means it's just a cork in the water waiting for rescue.

    I have a hard time accepting that waves of this magnitude could come up unexpectedly. It takes a good amount of time for waves to build to 8' in any reasonable conditions.
     
  12. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

  13. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

  14. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    I think it would be a mistake to put much faith in correct design. In the conditions you describe and the type boat you want, tremendous physical fitness and a whole lot of experience and knowledge would also be required. Overriding boat design and physical abilities though, pure dumb luck would decide if you made it to shore alive or not.
     

  15. MoePorter
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    MoePorter Junior Member

    Get very familiar with the National Weather Service marine forecasts - the forecast discussions, the bar forecasts, the point forecast & this one - http://pacificwaverider.com/pacnw/area/oregon/nowcast.shtml
    If you study them enough you won't have to design a boat for 8' waves...the point is you need more than a boat design to meet your mission.

    One big issue - are you going out through the bars or beach launch? Bar conditions are harder to predict & generally involve a long row just to get out. I'd think a 2hp outboard would be mandatory for bar access. Here in California salmon fishing from oars or paddles is a fairly extreme sport - but fishing off kelp beds for lingcod & rockfish is very accessible if you can beach launch - jettys are good as well. You pretty much have to stand up to pull a crab pot so initial stability is another factor to consider. So identify your fishing methods, target species & fishing areas more specifically - they will help guide your boat choice.

    Another big issue - 1 to 4 rowers? 4 rowers in a wind - ok, 1 rower in the same wind with a boat big enough for 4??? forget it...but then there's that outboard...Just make sure the outboard is happy back there with enough prop depth & steering access so you can control the thing by hand. 2hp in a well designed pulling boat is enough unless the boat gets pushed around by the wind by being high sided or without a keel of some sort - The MANY wonderful pulling boat designs available might need some tweaking to work well with an outboard.

    You will have to find a "comfortable" compromise between surfboat seakeeping & load carrying qualities (the SUV's of the rowing world); pleasure to row Whitehall types (Subarus...) and an Alden ocean type (dual purpose motorcycles...)

    I can think of 5 Bolger designs off the top of my head that a worth a look...Of course if I still had my 17ft Newfoundland sealing skiff from Chappell's American Small Sailing Craft. c. 1870...
    http://stillbuildingboats.com/seal-skiff/

    A good place to start -http://hallman.org/bolger/isometrics

    Keep in mind asking for advice about a 16-20 ft wood pulling boat in this crowd is like throwing chum to starving tuna...Moe
     
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