First boat 12 foot mini drifter for a river

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by jeremy_w, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. jeremy_w
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    jeremy_w Junior Member

    I'm looking at building a mini drifter abou 12' or so, and I've been looking at the glen L plans. People have said that they are pretty easy for the first timer(In general). a 12' boat will carry the fly rods, and gear I need, and still be ligh enough for me to jockey around on my own loading/unloading it, and it seems like the price point may not be too bad? The plans are lofted to full size patterns which is also nice. Any suggestions? I know people have used exterior grade plywood, sealed, glassed and painted to keep it on the cheap as well(another plan, atleast for the hull). I dont wanna screw up some expensive marine grade ply wood right yet. Here's a link to the plans, any help for a newbie? https://www.boatdesigns.com/12-16-Driftboats-McKenzie_Rogue-type-dories/products/819/
     
  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Welcome to the forum.

    That's too nice a boat to build from exterior plywood. Better to use marine grade so you will avoid some terrible problems associated with use of same. It won't cost that much more for a small boat.
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    You will get a better seal with epoxy than polyester.
     
  4. jeremy_w
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    jeremy_w Junior Member

    Alright. I figured exterior would be okay *** seeing how it would be getting glass, and paint anyways. Any idea on how much a B.O.M would be? I've also been looking at a CLC dory as well. The design is essentially the same for the most part. However the northeaster dory can be set up for 2 people to row which I would fore go and put adjustable seats in to better balance the boat for 1, or two passengers. Suggestions? Any help would be greatly appreciated! The glen-L plan set seems like it will cost about the same to make, and be alot more work(I dont want to get in over my head for the first time). and I have fairly limited tools. But can get acess to most that I may need.
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Sorry, my price lines are a little out of date. Make a materials list based on plans if there isn't already one in them. Do price survey in your area. Not hard to do.
     
  6. jeremy_w
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    jeremy_w Junior Member

    Thanks, I found meranti 6566 plywood in 6mm thicknessfor $37.00 a sheet Now is okoume a better wood? It seems like it is certainly more heavy. 20lbs for a 6mm sheet and $80.00 for it as well. What are the benefits? I would probably try to use a 3/4" fir sheet for the bottom of the boat, and 4or 6 mm for the sides, with a glass coating due to rocks, and all banging against it. Any suggestions? Thanks for the help hoyte, I am also looking at a 10' drift pram, maybe this would be a better first time boat build? https://www.boatdesigns.com/8-10-Drift-Prams-river-rowing-prams/products/716/ I have seen people use them in oregon on the Mckenzie river, and looks like a feasable option as well.
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    For a first build I would use marine grade fir plywood. 3/4" is pretty thick for such a small vessel, even the floor. It also won't bend well across such a small hull. Are you smuggling iron ore? Floor thickness can be less. Re-calculate. 3/8" is the thickness I would use on floor. Thicker glass (tape on seams) is advised at strike points outside and buttress inside strike point regions.
     
  8. jeremy_w
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    jeremy_w Junior Member

    Okay, thanks hoyte, good suggestions I appreciate it. Sorry if i'm totally ignorant, i'm trying to get a basic idea of what the best route is. a 12' or 14' would be nice, however for a first time build it might be a little too involved is the #1 thing I am worried about, and it seems like the Drift pram will also have a lowe BOM cost as well meaning I could outfit it with a decent anchor, and oar system, as well as a better materials. It seems like the basic design is pretty straight forward. What do you suggest?
     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Get the boat built first, being thrifty throughout. If the waters are sheltered with little current you can use anything heavy for an anchor. Don't just buy oars without proper sizing. Don't go for the most expensive but don't buy crap either. You might even want to build your own, depending on your skill level. You can even make an anchor with a coffee can, some concrete mix and an eye bolt. Put at least 3 feet of chain below the rope. That said, don't skimp on safety. Google these things.
     
  10. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  12. jeremy_w
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    jeremy_w Junior Member

    I've ran an oar rig(raft) as a safety boat rafting for a while. I like the sawyers a bit(I get them at a huge discount), and the pole cats are great for the price. a friend has an old spike anchor I can have, and I just figured i'd set my own block, and pulley up. The foot release systems are great, i've used them on a couple drift boats that a friend had. It will be only used in class II-easy three so nothing too major Is it possible to modify the 10' drift pra from glen L into a 12, without any problems? Or is that a no-no.
     
  13. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    I wouldn't make any modifications on a first build. Learn first to walk before you try to fly.

    Sorry. Didn't mean to sound like a Shaolin priest.
     
  14. jeremy_w
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    jeremy_w Junior Member

    Haha, that's quite alright, and understand. Does anyone make full size plans for a 12' drift pram?
     

  15. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

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