Engine Control System

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by gabriel, Aug 16, 2013.

  1. gabriel
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: venezuela

    gabriel Junior Member

    Hi Guys

    I Wan To Change The Current Engine Controls Of My 1982 58ft Bertram For A Newer And Better System. I Have Twin 675hp 12-v71detroit Diesel Engines .
    The Current System Is A Dual Function Controls A Set For Shitting And Another For Throttle. The Controls From The Upper Bridge Run Cables To The Lower Station , Then A Second Set Of Cables Rum From The Lower Station To The Engine .

    1- Is It Recommended To Separate De Controls From The Upper Station And The Lower Station?
    2- Can I Change From A Single Function Control To A Dual Function To Make Boat Handling Easier?
    3- Any Suggesttions For What Brand And Type Of Controls Should I Use In This Case?


    Thank You All
    Gabriel
     
  2. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    Hello Gabriel,

    The controls you describe as currently installed are typically called "Dual Lever" controls, one handle for throttle, one for shift.

    The controls you describe that you may want to change to are called "Single Lever controls," a single lever controls throttle and shift. Single lever controls have a throttle feature that allows you to advance the throttles, like at start up, without engaging the gears.

    It's this feature that makes dual station "single lever" controls problematic.

    The best way to get what you want is electronic controls.

    There are ways around using mechanical "single lever" controls and push-pull cables, but they are a completely different nightmare and I believe all the major manufacturers stopped making them decades ago. These units involved transfer boxes and switches and were just crazy complex.

    All the cable manufacturers have a high performance low friction cable upgrade. Morse has 33c supreme, U flex has one, I use Teleflex Extreme cables. The length of your cables will be heat stamped into the plastic jacket near one or both ends, sometimes in inches and usually at the end of the part number.

    There are two basic push-pull configurations for a dual station boat. The one
    you describe is called series and the cables go from the upper to the lower
    station and then to the engine and gear. The parallel configuration has each
    station running cables all the way to the engine and gear and is the more common arrangement, and provides some redundancy.

    You can replace with a low friction upgrade cable and call it a day, or break
    out several Boat Unit$ and switch out to electronic controls and have single lever controls.

    Steve Moyer Ft Lauderdale, FL
     
  3. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    At the time Bertram built your boat there was no better solution than dual lever control for such long cables. Single lever dual controls did exist, but the friction in the complicated transfer boxes, control mechanisms and cables was a real muscle exercise.

    Even with modern low friction cables I don't think you will be satisfied. Electronics or hydraulic controls (if you have no faith in electronics) are better solutions.
     
  4. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The electronic controls are very robust when installed correctly. Ive had them on this boat for 20 years. Also expensive. Most electriconic controls also have a mechanical backup in the engine room

    Push pull cables are the best cheap solution. When properly installed they work with minimum friction. The new style cables are very low friction. Always the problem with push pull cables is the cable runs.
     
  5. michael pierzga
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

  6. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Perhaps an upgrade from those 33 cables to more robust 43 size will be a help.

    The installed bend radius is less , but they are drop in replacements , with most systems..
     
  7. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    The 43C cables are indeed more robust, larger core, larger jacket, but I don't believe any "smoother." In fact, because there is a larger area of core in contact with jacket, theoretically this should make them have more friction.

    These cables are typically spec'ed on mechanical gears and heavy duty applications were additional force is necessary.

    The upgrade cables like the Morse supreme and the Teleflex extreme are advertised as having lower friction and being smoother operating, especially on longer runs. On my little trawler the upper station cables were 28 and 32 ft and the extreme cables were night and day from previous cables. I had parallel set up and never changed the lower station, both were very short, less than 10 ft.

    Steve



     

  8. alex n
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    Location: new jersey

    alex n Junior Member

    What you need is a Glendinning Smart Actuator 2 control system, basically makes an old dual lever system a single lever and has some very conveinient features like take and warm and sync etc..no morse cables etc..modern technology
     
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