Economy pilot boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DCockey, Sep 25, 2018.

  1. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Most pilot boats are designed and built specifically for use as pilot boats. But Eastport, Maine, which is visited by about fifty ships a year, pilot boat is the North Sea, a Nelson 38 which was originally built as a long range cruising tender for the 255′ expedition yacht Lone Ranger. The modifications for pilot use were minor; a stainless steel boarding platform, LED lighting, solar panel charging system, video monitoring, and new radio communications. Parts of a step ladder were added to assist in climbing onto the boarding platform. The solar panel charging system may have been added to ensure that the boat's batteries are kept charged even if the boat goes several weeks without being used.
    Eastport Pilot: First Launch of 2016 http://www.greatislandboatyard.com/eastport-pilot-first-launch-of-2016/
    History of the Nelson boats: A History of Nelson Boats and the Thornycroft Family - Nelson Boat Owners Club http://www.nelsonboatownersclub.co.uk/nelsonstory.html
    IMG_8860-2.jpg IMG_8864-2.jpg
     
  2. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Tied in Eastport near the North Sea was another boat with "Pilot" on its side, a vintage Boston Whaler. I don't know what the use of the that boat is.
    IMG_8869-2.jpg
     
  3. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    The previous Eastport pilot boat was the Medric II which was sunk when part of the Eastport breakwater collapsed in December 2014. It was a 48 foot multipurpose work boat constructed of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and powered by two outboards. The Medric II was used for tending salmon farm pens, transporting cargo, and surveying in addition to transporting pilots to and from vessels. Based on the photos of the boat after it was recovered the Medric II had a V-bottom and tubular sponsons similar to a RIB. https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Reports/MAB1511.pdf (See pages 6-7 for photos of the Medric II and description of the damage it suffered when the breakwater collapsed.)
     
  4. Squidly-Diddly
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    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    are these them boats what deliver the Pilot to the ship outside the harbor so he can guide it in?

    saw them doing that on TV, heard its now more done by helicopter.

    My problem was the guy was doing a semi-skilled semi-athletic step/leap onto the ship's gangway while the ship was still moving a decent speed. If he slipped and fell in water is the ship's crew (because I've worked at docks checking freighter crews on and off, and seen how they generally operate, and I wouldn't bet my life on them) gonna slam the propeller stopped in time for him not to be sucked in and chopped up? IIRC he wasn't wearing any safety harness attached to either vessel, just PDF(maybe).

    Seemed like Russian Roulette hoping for a minor-league rogue wave.

    For me, I'd like the ship to do a "test" where the prop is stopped while I hop on and off. Shouldn't slow them too much overall.
     
  5. DCockey
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    The pilot boat in the first post is used to deliver a pilot out to inbound ships and to retrieve a pilot from outbound ships. Video of pilot boat North Star meeting an inbound ship and the pilot taking the ship into Eastport. It does not include the transfer of the pilot to the ship:

    Helicopters are used in some locations such as the Columbia River Mouth.
     
  6. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    Or the mouth of the shipping channel depending on the port.
    Rarely. That would be very expensive.
    Thats why they get paid the big bucks.
    Time is money. Its the pilot's job to not fall off.
     
  7. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

  8. Waterwitch
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: North East USA

    Waterwitch Junior Member


    Around 2:50 in the video is the typical way of boarding with a Rope ladder some call a Jacobs ladder. With their reinforced hull seems they stick the pilot boat against the ship during boarding.
     
  9. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Probably my favorite boat builder on the planet.

    Frank at Safehaven is an incredible builder. Bucket list is to visit their shop.
     
  10. Waterwitch
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Waterwitch Junior Member

    Safehaven also builds a 38ft sportfisherman using the same hull as their pilotboat. That is a boat I would love to have.
     
    fallguy likes this.

  11. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I'd think "in this day and age" all the info could be given to ship without physically boarding.

    Have the pilot draw the route and speed on a photocopy of latest chart, couple notes on what the tide is going to due in next few hours at important points, take a pic, then text to ship's captain. Pilot would stand by in his port-side office with view of ship for any additional needed instructions.

    One pilot could handle up to 3 ships at a time (IMO lol).


    PS-shouldn't the ship drop a safety line to attach to safety harness? Personally, I'll do anything to avoid wearing these in construction because I'm too old and we never wore them when I was learning, and I feel I'm more likely to get pulled into some deadly object by the line, since construction sites are full of snags (and dumb people).
     
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