Dutch Euro Barges, None in North America?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by TeddyBear, Mar 19, 2007.

  1. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    I could well imagine an expensive trip to ship to the NW.

    But with all the steel boatbuilding that goes on up there I would imagine you could find someone to do a bang up job for a reasonable price. Then maybe find someone else to fit it out.

    I particularly like the looks of that classic 'sailing design', even though I understand it didn't sail particularly 'fashionable'

    I have another absolute beauty I what to post but my scanner is on the friz
     
  2. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    I believe this posting by RCardozo on another barge subject thread bears repeating here:
    The real truth about a Dutch barge

    I have been reading these posts and there is a lot of confusion about these vessels. I own the "Morgenster" ("Morning Star" in Dutch). She is a Dutch 73' sailing barge built in 1893 in Leiderdorp Holland. She is constructe of hammered iron plates rivetted together. This is similar to mild steel. These vessels were built to haul smaller cargo loads in canals rivers and coastal areas. I am in Baltimore on The Chesepeake bay. The bay is a shallow estuary similar to the former inland seas of Holland. My vessel was built before the combustion engine took over so it is sail powered. The mast is on a hinge so it can be lowered to go under bridges and sell produce in town via the canal system. Being a cargo vessel the design is to maximize blockage for cargo. Lots of space, easy in and easy out. The flat bottom reduced draft and allowed the boats to beach at low tide load cargo and then float off at high tide. My draft is 3'. The leeboards on the sides were used to avoid the maintenance and inconvenience of a center well and they also utilize an airfoil curve to assist in windward performance. When power came on the scene the hull shape changed with more pointed bows and no leeboards. Since these boats were carrying cargo they were very heavily loaded. The big rounded bow and stern added buoyancy to keep from being over taken by seas. The weather a barge can handle has a lot to do with the load. Since use as a yacht is very lightly loaded a Dutch barge can handle some rough seas. I have had mine out in the bay in 65 mph winds and 12-15 seas and she did fine since we were running with the wind. Now bear in mind with a flat bottom and 17' beam the last thing you will do is want to go broadside to the seas. That is the vulnerability because it will roll and scare you to death or beat you to death or capsize. I can't see blie water use of a dutch barge but it can do coastal use in rough weather if you behave. In summary these boats are very safe if handled correctly. Once motoring acros the Neuse river in NC. there was a 6' sea coming from the aft quarter. The speed of the seas and the speed of the barge were just so that the boat set up a harmonic and a gentle roll that slowly increased to 45 degrees! Slowing down stopped it. If I was bow or stern to the wind no problem. Even with strong seas off the bow quarter she justs pounds through. I would not hesitate to take the boat across the English Channel and many have. Trade between France and Holland and England had these vessels going to and fro all the time. Now the captains were not stupid. I doubt they went out with only 12" of freeeboard which was not unusual in a canal. Anyway that is enough for now. Greenseas knows what he is saying. Seaspark is a tad pessimistic.
    I love my barge. (A man and his barge is a beautiful thing).
     
  3. emc2mm
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Eugene, OR

    emc2mm New Member

    First, Pick a solution and have an adventure building or creating it. Any one have any plans/drawings or shape files for a dutch barge hull? or a late 1800's river scow with the sail like they used on the delta's and rivers on the west coast? They would sail to the ports full and turn around and sail back upstream.
     
  4. RCardozo
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Columbia, Maryland

    RCardozo RCardozo

    I saw a scow in San Francisco martitime museum and thought it was built to do the exact same thing as a european sailing barge. Built out of wood but same use and general form.
     
  5. Wavewacker
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Be cheaper to build that 60' river boat by Phil Bolger, it can be dressed anyway you like it.

    As to housing and building a boat (or buying one). Regardless of what the real estate market might be like now, years from now you'll seel the RE for more (if you can stay away from toxic dump sites). A Boat, any boat, unless it's a collectors item, is personal property and it depreciates just like a car or mobile home *depending on what it is) and one off boats built by owners will usually drop in price faster than your anchor.

    So, as was said above, living in or on something is not free, better luck buy RE living there and selling it later on, it's always worked better than living in personal property.

    But, I'd like to live on a boat for awhile too! :cool:
     
  6. luckyjr
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: houston

    luckyjr Junior Member

    thinking out of the box is what made this country. the problem now is, they gave away the box. I am about 60% finished building my 29 foot weekender. I used steel studs for the walls and floors and it turned out great and weighs less than marine plywood. If you want to build your own, I could give you some pointers. I owned a couple of steel plants in my working life. Love ur city, good luck
     
  7. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Luckyjr, Sounds like a good idea, just a few questions:

    How did you bend those studs to fair the hull and form the bow?

    How do you get them to butt up to be water tight, is it skin on frame?

    On the interior what did you use for the walls to the frames and what does it weigh?

    :D:D:D


    HEY, SKIPPER G, GLAD TO SEE YA HEAR!
     
  8. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I saw a canal boat in the states the other day and thought of this thread. Somebody has imported one. Pics to follow later.
     
  9. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Look thru this extensive discussion and you will find pre-cut kits as well as plans:
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/dutch-barge-long-distance-cruisers-11316.html
     
  10. luckyjr
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    Location: houston

    luckyjr Junior Member

    6" WIDE WEIGHS 1.49LBS/FT AND $1.00 A POUND. Comes 60' long
    nikon 039 2000.jpg

    If i were building, All light gauge galvanized steel. Pontoons and Structural
     
  11. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
    Posts: 4,955
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member


  12. TWendel
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Washington

    TWendel New Member

    Hey TeddyBear,
    Did you ever make any progress on that Dutch Barge. I'm looking for one myself.
    Todd
     
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