Dry-rot elixir for plywood a recipe anyone ?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by junkman, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. junkman
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: usa

    junkman Junior Member

    anti dryrot methods / mixes or how to ?

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    Last edited: Jul 19, 2010
  2. mitiempo
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Victoria B.C. Canada

    mitiempo Junior Member

    For preventing dry rot or removing it once it is there? Epoxy coating any bulkhead parts that will get wet as well as all edges before installation is the best method of preventing rot I know of. If it is already there the only solution is to remove the bulkhead totally and replace it or cut out the rotten section and scarf a new piece in. Using good marine ply in either case.
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Ditto. What are you looking for specifically?
     
  4. junkman
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: usa

    junkman Junior Member

    Hello,
    Since my post Iv had time to look into this subject more in depth. More reasons to due one way than another to list. I play with wood and artist oils as hobby, a tinker of several things but a pro. of none.
    I'm looking at building in plywood haven't decided what I can afford in quality as it will be some time before I build. Thinking a dry trailable trimaran for at least four people. The boat would be in the water intermittent, on weekends may be a week at a time. Probably glass and resin outside paint on inside ? Id like to cut parts out and saturate before building ? Ive found that there are many arguments on best practice, much depending on use of vessel and location due to temp, humidity etc.
    ----------I was thinking of using a varnish/sealer thinned to soak ends of ply-boards where there is much wicking and perhaps rolling on surface of ply wood.(this will only affect outer layers of ply as I understand). Lastly glass and resin outer shell and top, don't know about paint on inside. total encapsulation of glass on hull-boat in question for me as I read even resin has osmotic affect leading to encapsulation of condensation.
    ----------As an actual rot inhibitor I thought of using the environmentally friendly radiator fluid as an initial soak. It would not deteriorate glass/resin application. Also the car fluid will leach, saturate very well and stay in wood as inhibitor.It may carry a thinned oil varnish with it. Lastly several people have used in rot areas and spoor kill has been positive.
    I assume if cancer was the issue and five doctors on hand you'd have five different remedies.
    ----------recipes , one with a mix of borax,borax acid and radiator fluid.Very toxic use gloves mask ! Not something to through in a kids sand pox. I understand borax part dissipate rather quickly if saturated with water.Much good/bad on this recipe.
    these are some other notes I find of interest.

    [ Xynol polyester fabric exclusively since it allows for a much thicker barrier when buried in epoxy and is much easier to work with plus doesn't itch. He also believes in applying a very thick sheathing layer on the bottom of his boats.
    Interlux 1026 to seal or solvent thinned epoxy (like ESP 155 or CPES) or make your own. ]
     

  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    You got to start and finish with the same product. If you use varnish, then the rest has to be anothe alkyd product. If you are using fiberglass and resin, then use resin throughout. Also, use the same type of resin. Fiberglass fabrics are designed for use with specific resins, don't mix and match.
     
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