Dream Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Mr Efficiency, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Just recently I dreamt I was out on the water on a power boat, a cat, and it seemed to be motoring along in very shallow, clear water, Too shallow, surely to keep the props out of the sand ! :eek: So, I takes a look over the stern to see what's going on, and lo and behold, no propellors, just rotating, wide, smooth endless belts ! :eek:. Dream ends.

    A day or two later I did some googling and came up with this:

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/water-caterpillar-drive-36323.html

    I can certainly see the appeal of using friction to drive the boat, even turning the devil of drag into a virtue. But, in practical use in fast boats, leaping about in waves, keeping it in the water seems to me a major problem. Now, I am wondering, for a boat like a monohedron vee-hull, whether such a set-up could offer significant resistance reduction even if wide, rotating belts,from say amidships to the stern, moving like the surface you find at a supermarket check-out counter, were un-powered, and a conventional out-drive or outboard was used ?
     
  2. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    If only the belts can spin faster than the water flowing over them. Might be possible in small boat. Drive would cavitate and produce lift. I don't know how well it would last in salt water.
     
  3. Lurvio
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Mid of Finland

    Lurvio Mad scientist

    Might be interesting to take a snow mobile and build a hull around it, see what it does. :)

    cheers
    Lurvio
     
  4. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    dident they used to call them side wheelers?
     

  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Would it not be more "slippery" than a fixed hull bottom, even if not moving faster than the water ( unpowered, of course) ? Obviously it would have internal losses and not keep pace with the water flow 100%. As for the additional lift, is that correct, it would create greater lift ?
     
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