drawing needs scale

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by sandpiper32, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Actually there's a machine that can stretch an image, in one or both directions at different percentages. These were commonly used in the printing industry, before digital imaging make this unnecessary. Typically the image was "distorted" for certain types of printing operations, where the material that was being printed, stretched as it went through the press. The amount of substrate (usually paper or a PSA backed material) stretch through the machine, could be calculated and a rubber plate (called "flexo" in the industry) had the distorted image "burned" in photochemically. I've never seen an offset press with a stretchy substrate or distorted plate borne image, but they may exist too.

    There are also other reasons an image might get distorted. Lets say you have a new design and molds are being built, but the renderings make it look like the cabin is a bit tall or boxy. Well, the marketing team (in their ultimate wisdom) just might address this aesthetic, by distorting the image slightly, to make a longer, leaner looking cabin. These "stylized" images as they're called, where once artist renderings, some obviously distorted, but others, quite subtly.

    This is a very common place thing to do in offering any product and anyone with time in, "presenting" a product, would be aware of this. A McDonald's hamburger looks great in the advertising, but doesn't come close in real life. If you've ever worked with models, you'd realize they're nothing like what you see, in the final edited version of whatever presentation, they're featured. I've had the luxury of working with models and presenting various products and I can assure you, it's common place. Just about all products will have some sort of image manipulation performed, even if it's just improbable lighting or a complimentary angle, some level of "selling" it will take place. You guys need to get out more.

    [​IMG]

    This is the Ford Mustang on the top of the Empire State building. Looks like a Mustang doesn't it, but those familiar with the product will tell you, the intentionally employed wide lens used has distorted the image. It makes the car look longer and leaner. Just to offer some history:

    [​IMG]

    In 1966, the same shot was performed and in both cases, the car was cut apart with reciprocating saws, elevatored up and reassembled on the observation deck. Yep, the shots used in '66 where also "stylized". You don't think yachts and their presentations are any different do you?

    Something to think about . . .
     
  2. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Sorry, I do not know these guys but if you tell me they are very respectable people, I respect them. I do not blame them, I'm just saying your "procedure" does not work. I try to keep the OP beat his brains trying to implement your "solution"
    I think you're discovering America and you have not realized that was discovered many years ago. Overall, not always, your statement is correct: The first thing to do is to make the model and we must know the dimensions L, B, T. That, my friend is the problem. Strive a little, please, to understand it. If these dimensions are not known or you do not know where to where to measure them, there is no human who can build the model.
    I hope I have thrown some light on your hazy ideas.
    My respect and affection for you too
     
  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The OP came and asked, but hasn't replied in the 32 posts since, with is telling . . .
     
  4. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Perhaps he understood the point of the difficulty - or it was just too much work.
     
  5. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six Previous Member

    Or he read the replies.
     
  6. sandpiper32
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    sandpiper32 Junior Member

    Sandpiper 32

    Thanks for all the suggestions. Perhaps I should post some specifics in case someone knows of a sail plan for my boat. She is a Sandpiper 32 designed by Walt Scott and built by Marine Innovators in Clearwater Fl. 1978. She's a Presto sharpie, scaled down from the original Presto of Commodore Munro. loa. 32, lwl. 28.4, beam 8, dslp. 7400 lbs., s.a. 363, draft- boards up 1'7", boards down 4'6". Her first owner, Britton Chance Sr. changed her rig from free standing cat schooner to two Soling mains on tabernacles. She has always been cat rigged. L.F.H. calls this rig a periauger, not a cat schooner. I'd like to go back to the original free standing rig, hence my query about my brochure, showing the original rig with a larger main and smaller fore. To the gentleman who suggested I might not be up to the task of figuring out some of the suggestions, because of my absensce from the forum, I was out cruising. He's right that I'm not smart enough to figure out some of this stuff. I'm more of a hands on kinda guy. Here's a low res version of my brochure.
     

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  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This is the boat.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is a "Presto sharpie" style of hull form, after the Munroe design. These were built in St. Pete/Clearwater in the 70's. I'm not sure of the numbers but the company is long gone (gobbled up in the dark years of the early 80's market glut).

    There are dozens of this style of yacht (Presto's) with living designers behind them.
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Are those poles holding the forward end of the wishbone?
     
  9. Rabah
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    Rabah Senior Member

    Hi PAR,
    From that you have written has understood that you are afraid that images will be stretched or manipulated. It is quite possible, but it more to concern to images in an axonometric. I wrote about method concerns only to images in a side elevation and a topside view/plane/. There it is impossible manipulate. Stretching in the printed image - yes, it is possible. But for the whole image and not for just some part from it, to signify it does not foil to increase or decrease up to the size of the model.
     
  10. sandpiper32
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    sandpiper32 Junior Member

    That's the same boat but with original sticks, the sails furled on the masts with drums at their bases. The frwd end of the wishbones are held up with a strut. I'd like to use conventional booms with the free standing masts. I'd build birds-mouth, hollow doug fir round masts ala Ruel Parker.
     
  11. Rabah
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Rabah Senior Member

    Hi All,
    There can be our friend searches for it. But personally I in any way do not like the stem line.
     

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  12. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Published dimensions, particularly length, are frequently erroneous. Measure several large dimensions on your boat such as the overall length, length of the house, distance from the bow to the two masts (assuming the masts on your boat are in the original positions). Then use the simple ratio method to find the drawing scale based on each of those dimensions. If each of the resulting scales are the same or close then the drawing probably has not been distorted lengthwise.
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Rabah, I'm not sure how much effort you've put into that drawing, but it might be helpful if you knew how a Presto was shaped first.
     
  14. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    ... like the stern skeg that didnt show under the waterline . Not easy to do in Delftship either.

    Scaling is one thing, but publishing a graph on fictional sections is a waste of time.
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Again, I'm not sure of the intent of that drawing, but it's not even remotely close to a Presto. A typical Presto is trim, with a fine V shaped entry, flattening out to modest deadrise amidship, with a fairly soft bilge which progressively reverses, as you move farther aft, as it "builds down" to the skeg. The type is well known and most designers have a version or two of one as well.
     
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