Downgrade from Windows 7 to XP?

Discussion in 'Software' started by Willallison, Apr 25, 2010.

  1. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Willallison Senior Member

    So I just bought myself a whiz-bang new laptop which runs Windows 7. So far, I've been unable to load any of my programs, with the exception of my old faithful Rhino 3 (which I plan to upgrade anyway).
    So - should I 'downgrade' to XP?
     
  2. conceptia
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    conceptia Naval Architect

    no you shouldn't have to.. go to microsoft website, where you will get xp platform for free download. You can install it, and you can then work in all the softwares compatible with the XP, in the XP platform.
    It is to be noted that the XP u download wont be a separate OS, but will be XP platform supported on Windows 7. The window for XP will look alike the remote desktop. Thus you can work on normal office softwares in windows 7 and the XP supported software in the remote window of XP.
     
  3. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    masalai masalai

    hehehe , I would suggest Linux and "wine" as your XP look-alike without all the crap, virus and what-not attacking your machine - or if you like something to work "out of the box" get a Mac... Apple that is, the other style has loads of fat, GM-foods and sugar and will ruin your health...
     
  4. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    good luck with all the viruses spybots and malware you get whenever you play with a PC
    I finally gave my old PC lap top away and got a MAC
    works like a charm every time I turn it on

    cheers
    B
     
  5. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Yes Will,

    I recently did the same. A nice sideeffect was, that XP is flying with the installed 4gb Ram, Win 7 has eaten them up like nothing and was slow (the usual effect with new Microcrap OS).

    Regards
    Richard
     
  6. Luckless
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Luckless Senior Member

    Stick with windows 7, install the WinXP platform.

    To avoid spyware:
    1. read up on windows services and close down unneeded ones (Actually I think this is done for you in Win7 and Vista, but never hurts to double check.)
    2. Run a proper firewall, ideally hardware, but software firewalls are often easier for most users to configure.
    3. Stay off the *****, ****, and other dodgy sites.
    4. Do not open any and every link/file that comes your way, think about things before you act.
    5. Pay attention when installing software! Actually READ what the installer is about to install!

    Things to keep in mind:
    The first virus that spread outside of a contained lab was on Apples.
    All computer systems are open to attacks and glitches.
     
  7. AmnonMikeCohen
    Joined: Feb 2008
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    Location: Crofton BC Canada & Hertzeliyah Israel

    AmnonMikeCohen Inventor

    Another Option, I employ

    :) Real helpful responses and good wise help to this question - but as you read this one also, what I have been doing, is employing the new computers I buy but also keeping and using the old reliable clean and amply fast older computers.

    This allows you to save records on External portable Memory and clean the older machine to run faster - as newer is not better nor faster because programs are bigger- and where working with newer laptops you are subjected also to these ongoing updates and plug-ins and where you can not start where you want to on a laptop which is not always ON power and does not do its subroutines, as it is for desktops.
    A laptop should be like A Phone or desktop or TV, ready for use on ON after an OFF.
    Vista, is/was bad for my question "Who is the owner, of my computer, me or the internet service providers and software vendors!?
     
  8. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    marshmat Senior Member

    My vote is no, you should not downgrade from Win7 (actually 6.1) to XP. (I used to recommend doing this with Vista, but no longer with Win7). For one thing, you probably won't be able to find XP chipset, video and SATA drivers for your new hardware. XP's end of life has already been extended to 2014 and will almost certainly not be extended again. As good as it was for its time, XP just has too many holes now- and while I still have a few machines running it, I've had to lock them down pretty tightly to maintain a reasonable level of security. And, much as it pains me to say it (I've always hated Windows), Win7 is finally up to par on security and most of the Vista bugs have been fixed. It's the first M$ product I've used that feels like the finished thing and not like I'm a paying beta tester.

    If you have stuff that will install on Win7 but will not run properly (or at all), find the executable, open its properties box, and find the Compatibility tab- setting it to run in WinXP SP3 mode will tame all but the most ornery programs.

    For the remaining few programs that just won't install and that can't be tamed by compatibility mode, VirtualXP mode will usually do the trick. This is a full, licensed WinXP installation in a virtual machine, and is a free add-on for Win7 pro and ultimate. Being a VM, it'll take up the half-gig of RAM that XP needs to sit idle, plus whatever is needed to run your software. VirtualXP mode is meant to ease the transition for slow-to-evolve business software and is not an ideal long-term solution.

    If you have need for any of the sketchy stuff Luckless mentions (*****, ****, virus development, etc.) then you really ought to be doing that in full-fledged VMs under VMWare or VirtualBox. Letting any of that crap on a primary machine is just plain dumb, even if you do have good malware controls (tight firewall, Symantec SEP corporate or similar, etc.)

    If I may ask, Will, what programs are causing you trouble?
     
  9. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    masalai masalai

    I wonder if the flaws inherent in past Microsoft OS have been fixed? With a virtual global monopoly the responses to longstanding flaws seem to be ignored whereas the minors (Apple Mac and Linux seem to be very active in rectifying any bugs or vulnerabilities... Check what your ISP uses for robust reliability... The good ones use Linux or BSD based on the Unix philosophy...
    See http://distrowatch.com/ where there are some 100 "flavours" set up to meet various needs... If Apache is the server application, then your ISP is likely using Linux, as is used on the Cray and other mission critical machines...
     
  10. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    ya I checked this one out cause I was curious how one might downgrade from windows
    I always thought that was kinda rock bottom :p :p :p
     
  11. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Many of them have. Undoubtedly there will be new ones found in due time, of course. But so far, the IT pros say it's proving much harder to hack / infect / screw up Win7 than previous versions.
    I remember an amusing incident a few years ago, in which I received an error from one of Microsoft's own servers.... the details of which indicated that the error was detected and reported by an Apache box. On microsoft.com.

    Unfortunately, Mas, many engineers simply must have a good Windows machine somewhere, even if it's really a VM with a Linux host. Wine and other compatibility layers do not work with a lot of CAD software (no matter how much tweaking you do), and native Linux or OSX versions do not exist for many CAD packages. And if you have to have Windows, you may as well run the most recent and least leaky/buggy version that your hardware can handle.

    (An aside: Personally, I run them all- my main workstation runs a Win7 host with Linux Mint, Scientific Linux (Redhat-based), Fedora and OpenSolaris virtual machines, and more VMs on the way as I fiddle around with new stuff.)
     
  12. Brian@BNE
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    Brian@BNE Senior Member

    Will, I endorse what Marshmat is suggesting. Just be aware that with some VM's you can still have the same driver issues for your new hardware that you would get if you downgraded. Compatiblity mode is preferred.

    If you have some 'favorite' programs that can not operate under compatibility mode then just keep an old PC in a corner to run them, and switch data with USB drives until you upgrade that software.

    Win 7 is very good. Linux is fine if you enjoy all things IT and have the time to fiddle and set it up, MAC's are great but you'll be 'emulating MS' for uncommon programs anyway.
     
  13. Grant Nelson
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Grant Nelson Senior Member

    Here is a third vote for the 'Marshmat approach'.
     
  14. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Thanks Gents... I'm hesitant to take a jump backwards... hence the question. I'll give it a whirl and let you know how I get on....
     

  15. conceptia
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    conceptia Naval Architect

    hey will allison, did u try on my suggestion? It really worked on my laptop.. If u want instructions I can help ya.
     
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