Dory question

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by 8ball, Jun 21, 2014.

  1. 8ball
    Joined: Jan 2013
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    Location: Maine

    8ball Junior Member

    I've attempted to load a picture, hope it works.
     

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  2. 8ball
    Joined: Jan 2013
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    Location: Maine

    8ball Junior Member

    I believe I have a picture. As you can see it's just a big open boat except for flotation chambers fore and aft and the engine box. Right now I'm repairing the trailer and putting in a new R&D flex coupling on the gearbox (stole the old one to get another boat in the water).
     
  3. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Leeboards would help with the wind forward of the beam. They stay out of the way and are easy to build (see some Bolger designs of the same size). With whatever rig you use, mast/board placement fore and aft can be determined by CEs from the many St Pierre boats out there (yours hasn't got the overhangs of the classic St Pierres but that shouldn't matter).
    They are great sea boats, light but they are not finicky about being loaded down with a ton of cargo (they simply become a "bigger boat").
    Nice boat. How about a cuddy forward to stow gear and to house a bunk and a gally and a head, and to stow the sail?
     
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  4. 8ball
    Joined: Jan 2013
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    Location: Maine

    8ball Junior Member

    I wish I had the room for a cuddy, unfortunately by the time I load fishing gear which is usually five tubs of longline, buoy lines, flyers, hand reels and two of the insulated containers you see in the foreground plus ice, bait my lunch, oilgear and an extra sweater or two there's not much room for me and some room to work. One of the reasons I became interested in sails is that I need to put a mast on the boat anyway because I'm getting to old to haul large fish aboard without some mechanical assistance. I've caught several Bluefin tuna lately and had to have someone else bring them in, which means I had to share the proceeds. I think if a tuna didn't get much over 500# I could get it aboard, when I was young we used to have six men standing on the side of dories like this pulling herring twine aboard.
     
  5. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Yup she's a classic motor dory, and a big one at that :). These big Newfoundland style dories were different from their modified St. Pierre style in that the St. Pierre has much more rocker and sheer much like the river runners. The dory was first introduced to North America into Newfoundland via. the early European fishing fleets around the very early 1500's. A great sea boat that lent itself to easy construction with a few basic tools thus their popularity among the early wilderness boatbuilders. This is another modified easily rowed version developed here in Nova Scotia for "Off The Beach" fishing with it's schooner style surf bow, Commonly called The Shelburne Dory. I'm sure since it's introduction to North America these boats have evolved into as many styles as the coves they were used in. This is my Shelburne sport fishing /exercise machine.(old semi retired men tend to fatten a little) :)
     

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  6. 8ball
    Joined: Jan 2013
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    Location: Maine

    8ball Junior Member

    It seems the classic dory shape has been reformed innumerable times to meet a local requirement or an individuals taste. the ubiquitous banks dory may make it seem that they are all the same but nothing could be farther from the truth. These large seine dories like mine were produced first in wood and later in 'glass in Canada and the US, every builder had their own ideas. There are several around here that are molded to appear lapstrake but as far as I know none were as big as mine, and I went with size. Yours is a very pretty boat and I'm sure it's a pleasure to pull.
     
  7. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Be very careful trying to haul a 500 lb tuna aboard using a mast. If the boat rolls with 500 lbs hanging from the mast it might just keep rolling.
     

  8. 8ball
    Joined: Jan 2013
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    Location: Maine

    8ball Junior Member

    These things have to be done delicately, I used to haul tuna aboard my 26 ft. Sisu lobsterboat with a nine ft. gin pole, one was 811#, I also used to haul forty to fifty metric tons of fish aboard a two hundred foot factory trawler in the Bering sea, scale is different theory the same.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2015
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